Japan begins COVID-19 vaccination drive amid supply worry

first_imgLocal NewsBusinessWorld News Twitter By Digital AIM Web Support – February 16, 2021 Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest WhatsApp Facebookcenter_img Previous articleMillions endure record cold without power; at least 20 deadNext articleJames, Lakers, minus Davis, fend off Timberwolves 112-104 Digital AIM Web Support Twitter Japan begins COVID-19 vaccination drive amid supply worry Pinterest TOKYO (AP) — Japan’s first coronavirus shots were given to health workers Wednesday, beginning a vaccination campaign considered crucial to holding the already delayed Tokyo Olympics. The progress the campaign might make is uncertain, however, in a country concerned about possible shortages of imported vaccines and where people are often reluctant to take vaccines due to worries of side effects. The massive drive comes after the government gave its belated first approval Sunday for shots developed and supplied by Pfizer, which have been used in many other countries since December. Japan fell behind after it asked Pfizer to conduct clinical tests with Japanese people in addition to the company’s earlier tests in six other nations. But officials say it was necessary to address the concerns of many Japanese about safety in a country known for low vaccine confidence. Supplies of imported vaccines are a major concern because of supply shortages and restrictions in Europe, where many are manufactured. Supplies of imported vaccines will determine the progress of vaccination drive in Japan, the country’s vaccine minister Taro Kono said Tuesday. Some of 40,000 doctors and nurses from 100 selected hospitals across the country received their first shots Wednesday, with their second shot planned for March 10. Half will participate in a 7-week health survey. After weeks of delay, Japan’s inoculation program is running on a tight schedule. Vaccines arrived in a Tokyo hospital late Tuesday, the night before inoculations for its staff started Wednesday morning. A first shipment of the Pfizer vaccine that arrived last Friday is enough for 40,000 doctors and nurses from 100 selected hospitals across the country, Kono said. Inoculations of 3.7 million more health workers will begin in March, followed by about 36 million people aged 65 and older starting in April. People with underlying health issues, as well as caregivers at nursing homes and other facilities, will be next, before the general population receives its turn. It will be around June by the time ordinary people have their turn, and reaching a so-called “herd immunity” against the virus before the Olympic would be impossible, experts say. The 2020 Tokyo Olympics are to begin in July. Japan’s mistrust of vaccines is decades old. Many people have a vague unease about vaccines, partly because their side effects have often been played up. Half of the recipients of the first shots will keep daily records of their condition for seven weeks, data that will be used in a health study meant to inform people worried about the side effects. TAGS  last_img read more

JUST IN -Two Guns, Meth, And Marijuana Found During Car Stop- Three Suspects Arrested

first_imgEvansville Police, Narcotics Joint Task Force investigators, and members of the FBI Task Force arrested 3 people on gun and drug charges during a car stop on S. Green River Rd around 9:45am on Friday.Police received information that KARLON COLE, 43, was in possession of methamphetamine and was armed with a handgun in the area of Green River Rd and Vogel.A detective observed COLE on the lot of Taco Bell. Another person got into the SUV for 4-5 minutes, then got out and left in another vehicle. COLE then drove away. Officers confirmed COLE was driving on a suspended license. COLE was pulled over by patrol officers in the 200 block of S. Green River.During the stop, COLE was found to be in possession of a .22cal handgun. COLE is a convicted felon and is on probation for dealing meth in Kentucky. He is not permitted to own a firearm due to his conviction. He also does not have a permit to possess a handgun.A passenger in the SUV, TERRANCE HARDIMA N (27), was found to be armed with a loaded 9mm handgun. HARDIMAN has a prior conviction for criminal recklessness and possession of a handgun without a permit in Gibson County.HARDIMAN and COLE both confirmed that the person who had gotten in the SUV bought marijuana from HARDIMAN. Marijuana and meth were found in the SUV.Another passenger, FITOLAY DEMESMIN (36), was also arrested.The person who reportedly bought marijuana from HARDIMAN was not located.The suspects were booked into the Vanderburgh County Jail on the following charges:COLE- possession of a weapon by a convicted felon, possession of a handgun without a permit, maintain a common nuisanceHARDIMAN- possession of a handgun without a permit with a prior conviction, dealing marijuana, dealing meth, visiting a common nuisanceDEMESMIN- visiting a common nuisanceFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Hedge account confusion

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed IngredientsThe first look at the ’18/’19 USDA supply and demand estimates are out.Corn yields are predicted to be 174. If this happens, U.S. carryout would be reduced from the current 2.1 billion to 1.6 billion next year, a 20% decrease. World carryout predictions were also reduced by nearly 20% as well. Both seem to be a long term potential positive for the corn market.Unfortunately the market didn’t react well to the bullish news. Some in the trade were suggesting that large carryout in U.S. and world wheat stocks were just too bearish and that those projections pulled corn down. Still, a weather scare over the next 60 days could shift the course for corn prices, because there is little weather premium in the market. However, if national yields approach 177+, a rally will be unlikely and prices could eventually fall well below $4 for Dec corn futures.Beans also had a little bullish news, as world carryout dropped 6% and U.S. carryout is predicted to decrease 20%. Still, tariff and export pacing uncertainty continues. As in corn, weather issues will be the biggest factor over the next 90 days. Hedge accountsI’m frequently asked how the gains and losses are reflected in my hedge account when I detail out my trades. Hedge accounts can be overwhelming to farmers when they first use them. I was confused the first time I saw how it was done. At first it can be unclear how all the different types of transactions will show up in a hedge account and how profits and losses will be displayed. For example some farmers may not realize that they need to account for the cash price of the check they receive from the end user.That’s why I don’t use my hedge account line items and summaries to determine the value of my corn. Instead, I prefer using spreadsheets where I track all of my trade detail to determine my final prices for the corn I sell. Doing it this way allows me to better understand how market carry, basis, futures and options affected my overall price position.The following illustrates my point. Below I show a summary of my current corn position broken out by futures, carry, basis and options. I then detail out how it would have shown up in my hedge account. Then I show the math of how one can use the hedge account summary to still get to a final cash price. Walking through the tradesI always start with my original sold futures price, the spread or market carry I collected, any premiums received from options trades and the basis value I sold to determine my final cash price.Following is my current 2017 corn positions (52% sold futures position) that I shared last week:Current Position$3.57 – Futures$0.05 – Average Market Carry From Dec to May futures$0.09 – Market Carry premium from May to July futures$0.64 – Options Premium$4.35 – Equivalent value against July Futures-$.42 – Basis verses the July futures picked up on the farm$3.93 – Final Cash Price picked up on the farmBasis history — I set my basis on 50% of my ’17 crop back in March to be picked up on my farm in June/July for -.42. When I set the basis with an end user I give them cash grain in June/July and they give me futures, July in this case, so both of our positions remain equal in our respective accounts.Side note: This is a very common transaction and how most big grain companies sell grain to one another. Instead of exchanging futures with an end user, I could have just bought my futures position back in the July contract. However, doing it this way assures that I won’t have any price risk between when I call the end user to price the grain and when I call my broker to buy the futures back. Either way of doing the trade will cost me the same amount in commissions. Dates and summaries of the above trades in my hedge account3/5/18 — I set my basis on 50% of my ’17 crop to be picked up on my farm in June/July for -42 cents. As stated above, when I exchanged futures with the end user, they gave me July futures at $3.93 (the July futures value on 3/5) because I was giving them cash grain. This means the end user will write me a check for $3.51 ($3.93 + (-.42) cents basis) after the grain has been picked up off my farm. My hedge account after the exchange showed that I was long July futures at $3.93.4/20/18 — Some of my options got exercised. I also had some sales already on from previous trades that were already short May futures at $3.57 futures + 5 cents of Market Carry from previous futures months that were eventually rolled to May futures. My account will show that I’m short May futures for $3.62.**The actual value in my account might have been a different value to get to that point, but I would have incurred a profit or loss in past trades up to this point that would have made the value of corn in my account this level.4/24/18 — I rolled my May position to July and collected 9 cents of market carry profit. That was done by buying the May futures back at $3.79 and selling July at $3.88. That transaction means that I’m buying my short May futures back and selling July futures. Because I was long July futures from the basis trade those contracts are offset and disappear from my hedge account as well as the May futures. How my hedge account looked after each trade3/5 — Exchanged futures with end user, causes long July futures at $3.934/20 — Options were exercised against the May, caused short May futures at $3.624/24 — Bought back May futures to collect carry, caused long May futures at $3.794/24 — Sold July futures to collect market carry, caused short July futures at $3.88 Hedge accounts aren’t always nice and neatAfter the 4/24 market carry trades, both my May and July positions disappeared from my account and it looked like the following losses happened:May futures that had been sold for $3.62 were bought back for $3.79 = 17 cent lossJuly futures which were given to me when I set my basis for $3.93 were sold for $3.88 = 5 cent lossThose two trades combined are a 22-cent loss that must be subtracted from my final cash price I’ll get from the end user in July. That means the value of my grain is worth $3.29 ($3.51cash price – .22 hedge loss). However, as I mention above in my positions, I still have 64 cents of options premium that I’ve collected in my hedge account along the way. I now need to add that value to the $3.29 price and it makes my true cash value for my grain $3.93.As you can see, by doing the long version of the math in the hedge account, the final results are the same, but it was more confusing getting there than the preferred way I showed above. Common hedge account confusion: Example market carryOne of the most common mistakes I see farmers make when they start doing their own hedging is that they get lost in the math and forget where or why the position is what it is. Following is an example of that.Let’s say a farmer sold some corn for $4 last July. Then in November they rolled their futures forward to March to capture carry. On 11/29/17 when Dec corn was $3.36 and Mar was $3.50, a farmer would receive 14 cents of carry premium. In this example a farmer has actually sold corn for $4.14 against March — the $4 original sale plus the 14 cents of carry.But two months later in January, panic sets in when the farmer is reviewing their hedge account statement and sees a sale of $3.50. How can this be? They never would sold at such a low level. They may think, “I must have made a mistake.”The farmer didn’t make a mistake, they just forgot that they bought back their $4 Dec future sale at $3.36 in late November and then sold March futures for $3.50 to collect carry. They made the right trade all along and profited from the carry, they just needed to add that profit in the hedge account to their current position. So, a $4 sale bought back at $3.36 is a profit of 64 cents. If they take their current position of $3.50 sale against the March and add that 64 cents of profit from the Dec trade in their account they arrive at $4.14 ($3.50 + .64)While capturing carry is relatively simple and low risk, it can trip up farmers when they review their hedge accounts in the future. The only thing that matters with carry is the spread level between the two months. The actual price of the two months doesn’t matter. Gains or losses from carry/spread trades don’t show up as a line item anywhere on the hedge statements. A farmer must keep detailed notes, otherwise it may be easy to forget these kind of details when reviewing trades or positions several months later. The importance of keeping detailed recordsI never open a hedge account statement and assume I know what my cash corn value is by looking at the values listed. Instead, I start with a very detailed spreadsheet that shows every trade I make with the following details:DatePriceWhat futures contractWhat % of productionWhich crop year it’s hedged forWhy I made the trade.Then when I roll my futures forward to collect carry, I enter each of those trades separately on their own line. That way I can see how much profit I made from carry/storage. I also detail out every basis trade so I can determine my final cash price.Finally I keep track of every options trade I make throughout the year, just like I do with futures. All profits and losses from options must be add (or subtracted) to determine my final cash price. Make the right trades and the math will work outMy top priority is making the right trades for my farm operation. I don’t worry if I have a positive or negative trade in my hedge account. My hedge account doesn’t always show the full story because it doesn’t include the cash price I get from the end users. Instead, I keep detailed notes of all my trade independently to ensure profitability and minimize risk.This process may sound complicated or overwhelming to some, but it’s necessary and gets easier with practice. I also suggest running the math on every equation at least two or three times to make sure you have accounted for everything. You may also consider finding someone knowledgeable in grain marketing to help you navigate your position and check your math as well. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. He can be contacted at [email protected]last_img read more

Taking a look at past and present trades

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLCI suspect everyone is waiting for the Aug. 10 USDA report that includes estimated ear weights and yields. I think if the average national yield is 175, $4 Dec corn is likely. Then every bushel above that value decreases Dec futures by 10 cents (i.e. 180 national yield would mean Dec corn at $3.50).Beans are still caught up in tariff issues while weather continues to be uncertain. There is a lot of risk in both directions right now. Market action: Previous trade resultsThree of my trades expired last Friday. As you can see below, the three trades provided me with relatively low risk potential opportunities to get added premium in a non-profitable, sideways market on some of my corn. In the end, one of the three trades added 9 cents of added premium to my ongoing “pot of premium” on 10% of my production and the other two were essentially a wash. While I wish I could have received a bit more added premium, I definitely prefer considering alternative trading solutions that allow me the opportunity to get some added premium over waiting and hoping this market turns around because I don’t know when it will. Following shows all the details and results.Trade 1: Sold callOn 6/18/18 when Sep corn was near $3.65 I sold the following call:Sold an Aug $3.80 call for 9 cents that expires July 27 on 5% of my ’17 productionIf corn is trading below the strike price when this option expires I keep the 9-cent premium and add it to another trade later.If corn is trading above the strike price when this option expires I have to sell corn for the strike price PLUS I keep the premium. This means a price of $3.89 on Sep futures. My trade thoughts and rationale on 6/18/18Since I still need to sell some of my remaining ’17 corn but I don’t want to sell $3.65 Sep futures, this trade allows me to get values close to $4 if we rally some. If the market stays sideways, I keep the 9-cent premiums. There isn’t a downside protection with these trades, but that isn’t the goal for this trade. Final resultsCorn closed below $3.80, so I keep the 9-cent premium to add to my pot of premium I’ve been collecting all year. Trade 2: Sold straddleOn 6/13/18 when Sep corn was around $3.85, I sold an Aug $4 straddle (selling both a put and call) and bought a $3.70 Aug put, collecting 30 cents total on 10% of my 2017 production.What does this mean?If Sep corn is $4 on 7/27/18, I keep all of the 30 centsEvery penny corn is below $4 I get less premium until $3.70. With the $3.70 put I won’t lose anything on the trade, but I don’t have any grain protected to the downside or sold.For every penny higher than $4 I get less premium until $4.30At $4.30 or higher I have to make a corn sale at $4 against Sep futures, but I still get to keep the 30 cents, so it’s like selling $4.30. My trade thoughts and rationale on 6/13/18This trade is most profitable in a sideways market. With the current good weather forecasts, I’d be happy collecting the premium to add to another opportunity later. However, if the market drops significantly I’m also protected from losing money or having to buy corn back with this trade. With what I know today, if the market rallies I’ll be very happy with a $4.30 sold price. I’m comfortable with any market outcome of this trade. Final resultsThe market closed below $3.70 so I made and lost nothing on this trade except commissions for placing the trade. Trade 3: Sold straddleOn 6/18/18, 5 days after trade 2, and after a 20-cent drop in corn with Sep futures around $3.65, I sold an Aug $3.70 straddle (sold both the put and the call) and collected 29 cents total on 10% of my production What does this mean?If Sep corn is at $3.70 at expiration on 7/27/18 I keep all of the 29 centsFor every penny corn is below $3.70, I get less premium until $3.41. At this point, I either have to buy back futures (i.e. remove a sale) or take a penny loss for every penny under $3.41 on the trade.For every penny higher than $3.70 I get less premium until $3.99.At $3.99 or higher I have to sell my corn for $3.70 against Sep futures, but I still keep the 29 cents, so it’s like selling $3.99 My trade thoughts and rationale On 6/18/18Like Trade 2, this trade is most profitable in a sideways market. But unlike Trade 2, there are no puts in place to protect my downside. I think a 20-30 cent range is likely. Since I’m behind in my sales and I want the market to rally, I would be fine potentially losing a little on the upside potential. Regardless, this trade only represents 10% of my ’17 production, so I’m comfortable with any outcome. Final resultsOn 7/18/18, when Sep corn was trading at $3.47, I bought back the put portion of the straddle for 25 cents. 13 of the last 15 years corn prices decreased from mid-July to the end of July, so I thought there was a good chance prices would fall below $3.41, and I would then have to take a loss on the trade. Instead, after commissions and buying back the call for 25 cents that I had originally sold for 29 cents I profited about 3 cent in the end. Those profits managed to cover the commissions in the previous trade and is why these two trades ended up being a wash. Market action: New trades I just placed and rationaleAs stated above, when the market is down and many signs indicate continued sideways activity, rather than doing nothing and waiting, I prefer to consistently seek alternative trading solutions in that provide relatively lower risk opportunities that could add premium to my grain marketing. That being said, on all trades I do I know all potential outcomes for any market scenario (up, down and sideways) and I’m willing to accept all three, or I don’t place the trade.Following details some recent trades including all the details and rationale. New Trade 1: Sold straddleOn 7/18/18 when Sep corn was around $3.48, I sold an Sep $3.45 straddle (selling both a put and call) and bought a $3.30 Sep put, collecting 15 cents total on 10% of my 2017 production. What does this mean?If Sep corn is $3.45 on 8/24/18 I keep all of the 15 centsFor every penny corn is below $3.45 I get less premium until $3.30. With the $3.30 put I won’t lose anything on the trade, but I don’t have any grain protected to the downside or sold.For every penny higher than $3.45 I get less premium until $3.60At $3.60 or higher I have to make a corn sale at $3.45 against Sep futures, but I still get to keep the 15 cents, so it’s like selling $3.60 My trade thoughts and rationale on 7/18/18This trade is most profitable in a sideways market. With the current good weather forecasts, I’d be happy collecting the premium to add to another opportunity later. However, if the market drops significantly I’m also protected from losing money or having to buy corn back with this trade. With what I know today, I would prefer that the market would rally and I’ll be very happy with a $3.60 sold price because I have a lot of different trades already working that need prices to be above $3.60. I’m comfortable with any market outcome with this trade. New Trade 2: Sold callOn 7/19/18 when Sep corn was near $3.51 I sold the following call:Sold an Sep $3.50 call for 10 cents that expires Aug 24 on 10% of my ’17 productionIf corn is trading below the strike price when this option expires I keep the 10-cent premium and add it to another trade later.If corn is trading above the strike price when this option expires I have to sell corn for the strike price PLUS I keep the premium. This means a price of $3.60 on Sep futures. My trade thoughts and rationale on 7/19/18Since I still needed to sell some of my remaining ’17 corn, but I don’t want to sell $3.50 Sep futures, this trade allows me to get a slightly higher value. If the market stays sideways, I keep the 10-cent premiums. There isn’t a downside protection with these trades but that wasn’t what I was trying to accomplish with this trade either. My overall ’17 crop positionThere is 45% of my ’17 crop is still unpriced. With the new trades above and others already in place that 45% is covered with different option strategies making my final position vary depending on the Sep futures price on 8/24. If Sep futures are:Below $3.30 nothing is sold but I collect about 10 cents on 25% of productionAt $3.40 I collect 10 cents on 35% of production but no additional sales are madeAt $3.50 I collect 10 cents on 35% of production but no additional sales are made$3.60 I will sell 20% of my production for $3.60 and collect 10 cents on 15% of productionAt $3.70 I will sell 20% of my production for $3.60 and collect 10 cents on 25% of productionAt $3.80 I will sell 30% of my production for $3.78 and collect 20 cents on 15% of productionAt $4.00+ I will have the right to finish my ’17 production sales for a $3.95 average priceWith Sep futures prices around the $3.65 level and the USDA crop report on Aug. 10, I have a plan that is ready for a range of prices. Like all farmers I hope prices rally, because I would like to finish up sales on the ’17 crop before Sept. 1. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. He can be contacted at [email protected]last_img read more

Pixorial: Old Home Movies Live Online with Editing, Limitless Hosting, and More

first_imgOr you can watch the magic in action here: Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Finally, here’s an example of the finished product, showing titles and transitions to great effect:Security Versus DiscoverabilityIn general, said Espiñeira via phone yesterday, Pixorial’s demographic is an older, more private crowd who want to share their family memories with a select few, a far cry from the hoards of early-adopting Google whores who want their every waking move to be indexed and searchable.“We take huge pains with security, and we take privacy very seriously,” he said.“The way we’ve architected the system, you need to be an owner or to be granted access before you can see the videos at all, and you have to be logged in. And only a handful of employees in the company handle the hard copies of media content. The rest of the time it’s here, it’s in a locked cabinet. The developers don’t have access to any of the media.”Needless to say, then, social profiles and video channels are not part of Pixorial’s current plan, but ensuring that their servers and users’ data remain virtually unhackable is high on the list of priorities. Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… jolie odellcenter_img Tags:#start#startups Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Startup video service Pixorial allows users to upload, edit, and share their videos from VHS, Beta Max, Hi-8, and other analog sources as well as standard digital files. The uploading process for analog formats does require users to mail in “primary documents,” i.e., the physical tapes themselves, for conversion. And HD downloads might not be the free-for-all that users experience on other, all-digital sites.Still, for the ability to digitize old home movies without any constraints on file length and edit and combine those files once they’re online, we think Pixorial deserves the attention of any users with memories on tape to save and share.The Big IdeaPixorial is the brain child of former Netscape and Oracle executives. The team launched in private beta in January 2009. “Like so many people, my family had boxes of VHS, Hi-8, and beta tapes full of memories; and there was no simple way of playing, let alone of sharing, those memories with others,” said CEO and founder Andrés Espiñeira. By allowing users secure storage of those memories in Pixorial’s cloud of redundant servers, Espiñeira found a way to increase the ease and decrease the costs and resources for digitizing and sharing those video files in a modern fashion.From a marketing perspective, too, Pixorial works. “The personal media and scrapbooking industries have boomed alongside web video and social media,” said co-founder Gina Miccio.“Pixorial brings all those components together into something that early adopters and baby boomers will love.”The User ExperienceAccounts operate on a freemium model with free accounts allowing for 10GB of uploads and 60 days of archived analog video and pro accounts that give users unlimited uploads and storage.Linking and embedding videos created on the Pixorial site is free, as is sharing them on Facebook. But downloading your own copy will cost you around $2 per video, and DVDs run the gamut from around $6 per disc for bulk orders to around $15 each for “glamour” DVDs.Users can expect a 3-day maximum turnaround time for physical media to be converted.Once media is uploaded, said company rep Melissa Hourigan in an email yesterday, “Scenes are determined by the creator. You can also tag portions of the video with metadata. You can mash scenes from different formats and different users.” These “scenes,” or clips, can be created from masters and edited by anyone the user shares them with, as well.And when users collaborate, they grant one another access to full-resolution videos. “When someone mixes your video with theirs and creates a DVD, they’re getting the highest quality possible,” said Espiñeira, giving an example of a soccer league wanting to create an overview of their season using footage from different parents of players.Customizable media players are not available right now, but pro users will get larger player sizes for their videos. Espiñeira also revealed that allowing users to create video scrapbook-type websites, similar to the offering from Fliggo, has been discussed as a distant destination in Pixorial’s roadmap.In-Browser EditingEditing features currently include the ability to designate, split, and trim video segments in Pixorial’s Scene Maker product and to add separate scenes, titles, and transitions into a single video in their Producer application. Effects are coming soon, as are more features to add stills and audio to the mix. Here’s a look at the editor as it stands – simple, with a user-friendly interface and streamlined features: 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Life (And Work) On The Treadmill

first_imgReadWriteBody is an ongoing series where ReadWrite covers networked fitness and the quantified self.I am keenly aware of the blister on my left middle toe. It would probably heal better if I didn’t insist on walking 10-plus miles a day.For a couple of weeks now, though my coworkers and I agree that it feels much longer, I’ve been spending most of my workday walking 3 miles an hour on a treadmill desk.Why? It’s part of a four-month experiment I’m conducting on myself. I’m starting by trying to drop some weight—20-plus pounds by December—while getting into measurably better shape.“Measurably” is the key word here. The quantified-self movement is a catch-all term for the efforts to better understand the human body through data. I can’t call this a perfectly scientific experiment, since I’m running a sample set of one and there are far too many variables to control.But part of the point of using treadmill is just putting down numbers—pushing myself further than I’d go in an ordinary day to see what happens.A LifeSpan Fitness treadmill desk loomed large in my fitness plans.Walking For A LivingThe first question: Can I do my work? The answer is yes—and far better than what I’d read suggested I could do.Most treadmill-desk write-ups recommend going 1-1.5 miles per hour, and some users report they can’t type at faster speeds than that.Setting the paceRedmonk analyst Stephen O’Grady confirmed this in his experience with a treadmill desk: He had to hop off to write longer pieces, and even email was easiest at less than 1 mile per hour. Two colleagues who tried the desk agreed: They needed to slow down to type. So O’Grady’s experience may be typical.Yet I’ve actually managed to write entire pieces—like this one, and the previous installment in ReadWriteBody—while walking at 3 miles per hour. (The treadmill’s maximum speed is 4 miles per hour, which is too fast for comfortable typing in my experience.)It’s possible to get substantial work done, even at 3 mph.I may well be an outlier here in my ability to adapt to working while walking. I credit the high-school instructor who taught me to touch type. I could already carry on a conversation while typing without looking at my keyboard, so on the treadmill, I don’t need to look down at the keys.If you’re constantly glancing at your keyboard, that likely throws off your balance. Your mileage may vary—I’d recommend going slow and then seeing how fast you can go.Can You Hear Me Now? How About My Treadmill?For phone calls, my conversation partners didn’t report hearing noise from the treadmill or my footstrikes. When I did a Google Hangouts video chat with colleagues, though, I found that the constant motion was distracting both to them and to Google’s motion-detection algorithms, which often threw the screen focus to me even while someone else was talking—so I turned off the camera except for when I was talking.The biggest drain to productivity has been the position of the treadmill in our open-plan office: I’m on the way to the kitchen, and it’s highly visible, so curious coworkers have come by to ask questions. (Mostly they ask if I can really type while walking. I’ve shown them drafts of this piece by way of reply.)Connect Me, Connect Me NotThe LifeSpan Fitness TR1200-DT5 has good basic controls. You can enter your weight, which helps it estimate calories burned. It also tracks time spent, steps, and distance.It also has a companion website and downloadable desktop software which ostensibly connects to the treadmill via Bluetooth. I say “ostensibly,” because I only managed to get the treadmill to communicate data to the desktop app and hence to the website twice. After the first day, it claimed to be syncing with the Lifespan website; after a week, the desktop app stopped connecting with the treadmill’s Bluetooth connection altogether. Just yesterday, it started working again. A LifeSpan support technician was not able to diagnose the problem.Meet the LifeSpan website—a circa-2008 disaster of outdated Web design.Which is just as well, because the Lifespan website and desktop app are both useless and ugly. Even if they functioned as advertised, I wouldn’t want to use them.I’m not alone. O’Grady, the Redmonk analyst who has a similar LifeSpan model, came to a similar conclusion. He thinks LifeSpan should stick to making fitness hardware, and leave software to other people.“I don’t trust [LifeSpan] to do software,” O’Grady said. “I can’t get the data out of it where I want to.”It’s frustrating that I can’t use the treadmill desk’s Bluetooth connection to connect to, say, the MapMyFitness app on my smartphone, which already collects similar data from the EB Sync Burn fitness tracker I wear. The tracker and the treadmill disagree on the number of steps I’ve taken—here, I trust the treadmill’s data, but I have no good way to reconcile them in one cloud-based store. O’Grady says he uses a Google Doc to log his miles. I just tweet them at the end of the day.It highlights a problem ReadWrite contributor Matt Asay recently wrote about: our quantified-self data is stored in a bunch of unconnected silos.LifeSpan’s mostly useless desktop app traps your data.The one aspect of the hardware I’d complain about is the emergency stop cord, which LifeSpan tells me is required by regulations. When I did a video chat, I found myself leaning in to better position myself in front of my laptop’s webcam, knocking the cord loose and bringing the treadmill to a halt. Every time I did this, the treadmill also lost all the data for my session to date.A LifeSpan spokesperson told me that safety rules require that the system cut off electricity when the cord is pulled, but it seems like LifeSpan could correct this problem with a tiny, cheap memory chip that retains data when the system loses power. (The Bluetooth connection seemed noticeably more erratic after I accidentally triggered the stop cord, though I’m not sure if the events were connected.)My Blistering PaceSo what’s it like walking all day? It’s easy on my back and neck, which seemed to suffer from sitting. But it’s rough on my feet—I feel sore to the bone, and there’s the blister I mentioned, which I probably could have avoided with more cushioned socks.And then there’s the sweat. When I first got the treadmill desk, I didn’t have a fan, and I went through three T-shirts in one day. Even with the fan, my boss took a look at me one day and said, “You need a shower.” Luckily, our office has one built in.Ramona the Love Terrier is skeptical.I won’t lie: I’m tired. I’m probably, relatively speaking, overdoing it, clocking an average of 10 or more miles per day. But I’m already pretty fit—I frequently walk my dog, Ramona the Love Terrier, up the Filbert Steps and around Coit Tower, a vertiginous climb even in our hilly hometown of San Francisco, and I often walk from North Beach to our office in the city’s SoMa neighborhood.So part of the test for me is not whether I can add a little bit of activity to a sedentary lifestyle, but if I can actually push my levels of performance and effect changes in my metabolism and body competition. And, yeah, fit into that pair of jeans at the bottom of my chest of drawers I’ve been avoiding.So far, so good: I’ve dropped six pounds in a little less than two weeks. That’s not the only metric I’m measuring, but it’s a useful data point.Correction: The model I tested is the TR1200-DT5, not the TR800-DT5. Apologies for the error.Are you quantifying yourself? Share your experiences in the comments or on Twitter with the hashtag #rwbody. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting owen thomas Tags:#Body#exercise#fitness#fitness apps#fitness trackers#LifeSpan#quantified self#treadmill desk A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Brad Shields needs to wear a Wasps shirt in anger before England call

first_imgShare on LinkedIn … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. All best wishes to Rob Horne and Adam Hughes, the latest players to be forced into retirement on medical grounds. Horne has had to quit at 28 after sustaining nerve damage in his right arm. Hughes, who had been thinking about becoming a commercial pilot, has been informed by a neurologist he has two major trauma scars on his brain and that playing on for the Dragons was not an option. Playing rugby for a living can be hugely rewarding but, sadly, a potentially career-ending injury is never more than one unfortunate collision away.Muldoon rides into the sunset They will rise as one in Galway this weekend to salute John Muldoon, Connacht’s remarkable captain, on the occasion of his final game for the province against Leinster. For 15 years and 326 appearances the back-row forward has given his all to the cause, not least in helping Connacht to confound expectations by winning the Pro 12 title in 2016. One of the modern game’s great warriors, his imminent move into coaching with Bristol really will be the end of an era. Share on WhatsApp Share on Facebook Share on Twitter There is just one snag unrelated to New Zealand Rugby’s sabre-rattling threat not to release him from his Super Rugby contract: Shields has not played a single minute of professional rugby for an English club. Playing against the British and Irish Lions in a midweek fixture on last year’s tour is the closest he has come to rubbing shoulders with any of his soon-to-be-colleagues.Picking him for this summer’s England tour to South Africa would, among other things, also imply Super Rugby is of a significantly higher standard than anything the Premiership or European club rugby can offer. Try convincing all the in-form English-qualified players based in France they are less deserving of a tour spot than someone employed 12,000 miles away.All of which makes this less of an eligibility argument than a question of judgment. Shields is more than entitled to opt for England but, for the sake of all concerned, that commitment should be displayed at club level in the first instance. Riki Flutey and Thomas Waldrom also represented the Hurricanes before swearing allegiance to England; both had to prove their worth in the English Premiership first. Piers Francis also had some experience of playing rugby in England before he was plucked out of Auckland last summer. It is a crucial distinction, particularly for other young English-reared players with international ambitions.Better for Shields to be told he can compete for an England place but only after he has worn a Wasps jersey in anger. To parachute him in, sight unseen, recalls the unsatisfactory precedents of Michael Bent and, before him, Brendan Laney. Bent, who qualified for Ireland via a grandmother, was rushed into the Ireland squad in the autumn of 2012 having only just arrived in the country and ended up winning just four caps. Laney was selected by Scotland in 2001 just two days after arriving in the country from New Zealand. Sign up for The Breakdown, our weekly rugby union email. Sportblog Eddie Jones The story of Brad Shields is a tale of everyday modern professional sport. Born in Masterton, on North Island, the back-row forward has played all his rugby in New Zealand, represented the Junior All Blacks in 2011 against an England Under-20 side containing Owen Farrell, George Ford, Elliot Daly and Mako Vunipola and is the captain of the Hurricanes. Now, on the basis of his English parentage, he wants to be part of England’s touring squad to South Africa in June.We should wish him good luck, clearly, as he seeks to become a capped England international. He is eligible, keen and his globe-trotting parents moved back to Berkshire a couple of years ago.He is significantly more qualified than several others who have worn the red rose over the past couple of decades and, at 27, it will be interesting to see how he goes once he completes his move to Wasps this summer. England, as everyone knows, are looking to boost their back-row resources and may just have found a valuable recruit. New Zealand rugby union team Topics Read more Support The Guardian features Brad Shields asks for New Zealand release in order to play for England Rugby union Sign up to the Breakdown for the latest rugby union news For those who have grown up dreaming of representing their home country or have spent years developing the next generation of potential internationals these cases are particularly galling. The counter argument is that players who have been leapfrogged should wake up and smell the espresso: had they been surefire Test talents their coaches would not have looked further afield. But how does anyone know, definitively, that Shields is a better bet than Don Armand or James Haskell or Courtney Lawes or Jack Clifford or Teimana Harrison or Carl Fearns or any of the other players potentially affected by his imminent arrival? Until he plays a few Premiership games with and against his northern hemisphere peers, no one can be absolutely sure.We are in danger of edging here into Sam Burgess territory: a big name arrival, in Burgess’s case from rugby league, with clear athletic potential but absolutely no track record in Premiership union. Shields is big enough to look after himself but how many rugby teams in history have been transformed overnight by the arrival of one individual, particularly a high plains drifter no one has met? Even Sonny Bill Williams, perhaps the best-qualified recent example, had to pay his dues before the All Blacks picked him. The best teams are built on all-for-one foundations, constructed over a prolonged period of time.All this makes the Shields case a fascinating one. Imagine something similar happening in football and Gareth Southgate bussing in someone from La Liga on the eve of this summer’s World Cup in Russia. For all Shields’ parental connections, plonking a rank outsider into a national squad is not a recipe for instant dressing-room harmony. Is booking someone overlooked by the All Blacks on to the first plane to South Africa really going to transform England’s World Cup prospects? Better, surely, for Shields to conclude his Kiwi commitments, settle in at Wasps and demonstrate this autumn he is worthy of fast-track promotion. Lobbing him a cap in June could create more problems than it solves.Thin line Since you’re here… Share via Email Read more Share on Pinterest England rugby union team Share on Messenger Reuse this contentlast_img read more

Putin and Erdogan in Turkey to mark key phase in pipeline

first_imgISTANBUL — Russian President Vladimir Putin and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan are in Istanbul to mark the completion of a key phase in a natural gas pipeline.The two leaders on Monday are marking the completion of the offshore part of TurkStream’s two lines that will carry natural gas from Russia to Turkey.The lines when finished are expected to supply Russian gas to European markets through Turkish territories. Together the two 930-kilometre (578-mile) lines via the Black Sea will carry 31.5 billion cubic meters (1.1 trillion cubic feet) of natural gas annually.Turkey relies on imports for its energy needs and Russia is its top supplier for natural gas. It bought 28 billion cubic meters last year. That gas is currently transported through another line under the Black Sea and the onshore West Line through Ukraine, which is mired in conflict with Russia.The Associated Presslast_img read more

IGNOU to launch awareness programme on GST

first_imgNew Delhi: The Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) will launch an awareness programme on Goods and Services Tax (GST) in collaboration with Bombay Stock Exchange Institute Limited from its July 2019 session, the varsity said on Monday.The programme, which will be launched by IGNOU’s School of Management Studies aims to impart basic knowledge and skills required to fulfil various requirements under the GST Act. This programme would be beneficial to people who are engaged in maintaining accounts and filing of various indirect tax returns, the varsity said. Also Read – Odd-Even: CM seeks transport dept’s views on exemption to women, two wheelers, CNG vehiclesEntrepreneurs engaged in small-scale business ventures can also benefit from this programme as it gives an overview of the procedures and formalities to comply under the GST Act, it said. The main objective of the programme is to impart skills to book keeping professionals to file various regular GST returns along with the various compliance requirements, it said. Those who have passed Class 12 are eligible for the course, which will be offered in January and July cycle of admissions. The study material, which is available online, is divided into seven small modules.last_img read more