Minis: How to play golden glove

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS NO, THIS isn’t a boxing match! Golden glove is a mini passing Olympics designed to test and improve youngsters’ handling skills. And just like last month’s golden boot, players relish the competitive challenge. Be sure to repeat each event, so that all passes are made off both hands. To learn the rules of the game, download the PDF here and take it to training!last_img

Five things we learnt: England v Australia

first_imgRight-hand man: Darren Shand has acted as team manager for successive All Black coachesEngland also have a team manager but Tom Stokes’ brief is not as wide-ranging as Shand’s. Shand is a key figure in the New Zealand staff, takes a lot of heat off the coaches and deals with things like discipline that, like it or not, have taken up quite a bit of the boss’s attention in the last few months. Lancaster, if he is retained, has enough on his plate trying to sort out his front and back rows and midfield and could do with ditching the rest of the nonsense– he could use a right-hand man who is not wearing a tracksuit. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Pause for thought: Where do England go now after their World Cup humiliation? The missing players, the talent within the squad for 2019, the power of the press and the need for Stuart Lancaster to have a right-hand man if he’s retained are all discussed TAGS: Highlight By Adam HathawayYou get better if you are off the sceneMartin Johnson always says he becomes a better player the longer he is retired and the same applied to a few of the England boys who have been unavailable, or disciplined or completely ignored during this World Cup. According to the predictable fire-storm that occurred on Sunday morning Dylan Hartley, Luther Burrell, Steffon Armitage, Manu Tuilagi and Henry Slade could have kept England in the tournament and at least a couple of them would have given Stuart Lancaster a better chance of staying afloat.No angel: Dylan Hartley has had his scrapes but is undeniably a leader in the England squadThe loss of Hartley was the most damaging – and the decision not to pick him when he was only banned for the first game against Fiji seems more baffling by the minute. Hartley once told us he had two jobs as a hooker – to scrum well and throw in well. He is also a leader and you can’t imagine England chucking the ball to number two in the line-out, in the last knockings, against Wales if he was on the field.Power of the pressBob Dwyer was a shrewd cookie as a coach and is a shrewd cookie as an ally of the Wallabies when it comes to the lead-up of a big game. Dwyer went into print last week accusing Joe Marler of scrummaging illegally and although the England camp said they had faith in Saturday’s referee, Romain Poite, not to take any notice the Frenchman clearly did.Under scrutiny: Joe Marler’s scrummaging technique was openly questioned by Bob DwyerPoite was right in giving the scrum penalties he did against England, maybe Marler has been illegal for a while now and maybe Dwyer just gave Poite the nudge he needed. Players always say they don’t read the papers, perhaps the referees do.Out of sight out of mindSteffon Armitage, yes him again, has been the name of most people’s lips after the disaster of England’s breakdown on Saturday night. David Pocock and Michael Hooper slowed down England’s ball and won the lions’ share on the floor and Armitage is has a bit of form in those areas too. But there are a few things for those clamouring for a recall of the Toulon flanker. Firstly he knew the rules when he signed a new contract to stay in France in 2013, and he would not have been short of Premiership offers. Missing link: Toulon’s Steffon Armitage divides opinion like no otherSecondly, at Toulon, he plays most of his rugby on the front foot and that is a very different place for a back rower to be in than having to scrap around with momentum against you. And thirdly, Stuart Lancaster is not the first England head coach not to fancy him and fourthly Armitage is now 30, so you can write him out of a way back into the good books at Twickenham.England have got talentThere are some talented players in England it is just when push comes to shove the current coaches don’t like picking them. You cannot quibble with the selection of Owen Farrell for the Wales match – England knew what was coming – but George Ford should have started against Australia and Danny Care must be wondering exactly what he has done wrong in the last couple of months.Unused: Henry Slade has showed rich promise and should be given a chance to shineA back-line of Mike Brown, Anthony Watson, Jonathan Joseph, Henry Slade, Jonny May, Ford and Care would have done some damage to Australia and that is without the footballing skills of Kyle Eastmond who did not even make the squad. Slade and Care will probably get a run-out against Uruguay but it is all a bit late now.Four more years for Lancaster?Stuart Lancaster was not giving any clues about his future on Sunday morning – he was just concentrating on preparing a team to play Uruguay on Saturday (yep…I know) but Ian Ritchie, his boss hinted there would be some sort of change. If you don’t go down the radical route and throw the entire coaching staff out, and bring in a Clive Woodward or Nick Mallett as some kind of rugby overlord, and retain Lancaster he could probably do with a helping hand. The All Blacks have a team manager, Darren Shand, who has been in place since 2004 and deals with everything apart from the playing stuff.last_img read more

France Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide

first_imgAll you need to know about Les Bleus at Rugby World Cup 2019 France Rugby World Cup FixturesSat 21 Sep France 23-21 Argentina (Tokyo) Match reportWed 2 Oct France 33-9 USA (Fukuoka) Match ReportSun 6 Oct France 23-21 Tonga (Kumamoto) Match ReportSat 12 Oct England 0-0 France (Yokohama) Match cancelled – click here for storySun 20 Oct QF3 Wales 20-19 France (Oita) Match Report LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS England Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Unlikely to proceed to the knockout stages, Tonga… France Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, GuideFrance saved their best for last at the Rugby World Cup in Japan as they excelled in their quarter-final against Wales, but ultimately they fell short.How They QualifiedFrance were one of the 12 automatic qualifiers for the 2019 tournament.Key PlayersHooker Guilhem Guirado has a prodigious work-rate, Antoine Dupont provides slick service from scrum-half and Damian Penaud has stood out on the wing this year. Alivereti Raka has also made an impact out wide.Captain fantastic: Guirado will probably lead the French in Japan (Getty Images)The Coach – Jacques BrunelAn assistant coach during France’s RWC fourth-place finishes in 2003 and 2007, Brunel spent five years in charge of Italy. He answered an SOS in January 2018 after Guy Novès’s sickly 33% win rate saw him sacked.SOS: Brunel became coach in January 2018 (Getty Images)Major Work-onsAs always, consistency is crucial for France and it’s something that has long been lacking. Brunel needs to settle on a first XV, although no one really knows who is making managerial decisions now Fabien Galthie has joined the coaching team.France Rugby World Cup Warm-upsSaturday 17 August: France 32-3 ScotlandSaturday 24 August: Scotland 17-14 FranceFriday 30 August: France 47-19 ItalyRelated: 2019 Rugby World Cup Warm-upsFrance Rugby World Cup GroupFrance are in Group C alongside England, Argentina, USA, and Tonga. Expand Tonga Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Expand USA Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Argentina Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Blue and white: France play England in their final group game (Getty Images)France Rugby World Cup SquadJacques Brunel has named his squad for the tournament as you can see below;Forwards (17):Jefferson PoirotRabah SlimaniDemba Bamba (replaced by Cedate Gomes Sa after suffering a thigh injury)Emerick SetianoCyril BailleGuilhem GuiradoCamille ChatPeato Mauvaka (replaced by Christopher Tolofua after suffering a hip strain)Sebastien VahaamahinaPaul GabrillaguesArthur IturriaBernard Le RouxGregory AlldrittCharles OllivonLouis PicamolesYacouba CamaraWenceslas LauretBacks (14):Antoine DupontBaptiste SerinMaxime MachenaudCamille LopezRomain NtamackGael FickouPierre-Louis BarassiSofiane GuitouneVirimi VakatawaYoann HugetAlivereti RakaDamian PenaudMaxime MedardThomas Ramos (replaced by Vincent Rattez after suffering an ankle injury)Related: 2019 Rugby World Cup FixturesPrevious World Cup Results and RecordFrance’s Rugby World Cup Record: P53 W36 D2 L151987 Runners-up1991 Quarter-finals1995 Third1999 Runners-up2003 Fourth2007 Fourth2011 Runners-up2015 Quarter-finals2019 Quarter-finalsFollow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. After a disastrous home World Cup in 2015,… Related: 2019 Rugby World Cup GroupsFrance Rugby World Cup Kit Los Pumas failed to make it to the… The Americans have been building in the right… Collapse Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Argentina Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide USA Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Tonga Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide England Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Expandlast_img read more

El uso de un terreno de la iglesia de la…

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 El uso de un terreno de la iglesia de la Trinidad se convierte en el foco de Ocupar Wall Street AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID [Episcopal News Service] Un pedacito de terreno propiedad de la iglesia episcopal de La Trinidad en Wall Street, situado en la Calle Canal y la Sexta Avenida y contiguo a la plaza Duarte en el Bajo Manhattan se ha convertido en el foco de Ocupar Wall Street (OWS) al tiempo que este movimiento contra la codicia y la desigualdad económica cumple su tercer mes.“Si el movimiento procura la equidad económica, la justicia social y la adecuada interacción contra gente civilizada, ese mensaje  puede transmitirse de diversas maneras sin tener que ocupar la propiedad de nadie”, dijo el Rdo. Jim Cooper, rector de La Trinidad, en una entrevista con ENS el 12 de diciembre, opinión que venía a reforzar un comentario suyo que había aparecido el 9 de diciembre en la página web de La Trinidad. Desde el inicio del movimiento, La Trinidad ha proporcionado espacio de reunión y el uso de sus instalaciones, cuando están abiertas, para que los manifestantes tengan acceso a baños y a descanso, pero se ha mantenido firme en no permitir ocupantes en su propiedad de la plaza Duarte.Los ocupas fueron desalojados del Parque Zuccotti -un parque público de propiedad privada que se encuentra en Broadway a dos cuadras al norte de La Trinidad- en las primeras horas del 15 de noviembre y ya no pueden seguir acampando allí de noche. Desde entonces, OWS ha sostenido que necesita “ocupar” un espacio para erigir su comunidad y llevar adelante su movimiento.Occupy Faith NYC, una coalición interreligiosa formada a raíz del movimiento OWS; George Packard, obispo episcopal para las Fuerzas Armadas y ministerios federales, jubilado en la actualidad,  y otros han presionado a la iglesia a permitir que OWS utilice su propiedad como base de operaciones. Unas 7.000 personas han firmado una petición a nombre de América Fiel, en la que se le pide a La Trinidad que le brinde santuario a OWS.Según el plan actual, los ocupas y sus partidarios se reunirán al mediodía del 17 de diciembre en la plaza Duarte para “Ocupar 2.0: Recobrar los espacios públicos [Occupy 2.0: Take Back the Commons] un evento de todo un día en apoyo de OWS y de “la ocupación y recuperación de los espacios públicos”.“Hay un plan de ocupar el espacio que es propiedad de la iglesia”, dijo Linnea Palmer Paton, estudiante de 23 años de la Universidad de Nueva York y miembro del grupo de trabajo de relaciones públicas de los ocupas, en una entrevista telefónica el 14 de diciembre. Pero, según ella, no se tomará ninguna decisión hasta el 17.La fecha del 17 de diciembre coincide con los tres meses del lanzamiento formal de OWS en el parque Zuccotti. También es el cumpleaños del soldado Bradley Manning (del Ejercito de EE.UU.) que se enfrenta a la corte marcial el 16 de diciembre en Port Meade, Maryland, por el supuesto delito de transmitir información militar clasificada a la página web WikiLeaks; y el primer aniversario de la autoinmolación del vendedor ambulante tunecito Mohamed Bouazizi,  el acto que provocó el surgimiento de la Primavera Árabe, las sublevaciones independientes y democráticas que se propagaron por el mundo árabe en 2011 e inspiraron al movimiento de los ocupas o indignados.Las protestas de OWS se han extendido a más 2.500 sitios a través del país y en todo el mundo. En el último mes, los funcionarios de muchas ciudades han tomado medidas para desmantelar los campamentos de los que protestan. El movimiento convoca a las ocupaciones desplazadas a través de la nación a reocupar espacios abiertos el 17 de diciembre.Un letrero fijo a la cadena que cierra con candado la entrada en el terreno perteneciente a La Trinidad dice: “Propiedad privada, prohibido el paso”. A través de la cerca uno puede ver una docena aproximada de bancos de madera y unas cuantas macetas también de madera. El suelo está cubierto de guijarros. La Trinidad le alquila la propiedad al Consejo Cultural del Bajo Manhattan (LMCC, por su sigla en inglés), que lo usa por temporadas para exposiciones de arte y eventos culturales al aire libre.Es la “totalidad de los problemas” -legales, sanitarios, de seguridad, uso del terreno, el ser un buen vecino-” que al sumarse todos ellos hacen que La Trinidad considere un campamento o grandes asambleas como un uso inapropiado del terreno”, dijo Cooper durante una entrevista el 12 de diciembre en Charlotte’s Place, un lugar de reuniones comunitarias que la iglesia posee en la Calle Greenwich, al sur del parque Zuccotti.“Y existe el tenue límite entre la política y lo espiritual, y nos centramos en lo espiritual”, afirmó. “Yo no sé cómo [el movimiento]Ocupar Wall Street se define a sí mismo”.Tomó 12 meses de negociaciones con el municipio de Nueva York antes de que La Trinidad pudiera alquilar el terreno -que está cerca de la entrada del Túnel Holland y que carece de agua y de servicios sanitarios- al LMCC, dijo Cooper, quien agregó que él y la junta parroquial y los guardianes de la iglesia revisan y estudian los acuerdos de alquiler.El 3 de diciembre, arrestaron a tres participantes de OWS que montaron una protesta y huelga de hambre para presionar a la iglesia a dejar que el movimiento de los ocupas levantara un campamento en la propiedad. Los pusieron en libertad al día siguiente. Con anterioridad, los manifestantes que entraron en la propiedad de La Trinidad el 15 de noviembre habían sido arrestados.Tarde en la noche del 10 de diciembre, Cooper y su esposa, Octavia, se reunieron con las tres personas que hacían huelga de hambre en la plaza Duarte y a las que para entonces se les había unido una cuarta. Los huelguistas asistieron luego a la Eucaristía de las 9:00 A.M. en La Trinidad, a la mañana siguiente, junto con Packard y su esposa, Brooke.Durante su sermón, Cooper predicó acerca de la profecía, la ley y el orden, y los duraderos vínculos compartidos que se forman en tiempos difíciles y de grandes demandas.“Todas las generaciones tienen tiempos difíciles, y a veces tiempos realmente difíciles”, dijo Cooper, citando la letra de una canción de Neil Diamond, en un sermón que repitió en la Eucaristía de las 11:15 A.M.Packard ha manifestado su apoyo verbal a OWS, aun cuando estuviera haciendo lo que él llamó “un renuente servicio de enlace diplomático entre los ocupas y la iglesias de La Trinidad”.“Tengo la gran preocupación de que esta venerable parroquia se encuentre del lado equivocado de la historia dentro de unas pocas semanas”, dijo Packard en un correo de la página de Facebook de la Trinidad que luego borraron. “De seguro que hay alguna consumada sabiduría en el liderazgo que pueda ofrecerles a los ocupas una oportunidad de expresar su destino profético en estos días. Es cosa sabida que la iglesia es eficaz en brindar servicio y ayuda al vecindario; al parecer [ese liderazgo]no es capaz de entender sus necesidades dinámicas. Dicho claramente, esto significa comenzar de nuevo los acuerdos de alquiler por una temporada en lo tocante a la propiedad de Duarte. Piensen que les estamos ofreciendo hospitalidad a viajeros del futuro que son portadores del mensaje de “basta ya de injusticia”. Si viéramos realmente a OWS por lo que ellos son, en lugar de ponerles obstáculos en su camino, ¡realmente nos regocijaríamos con su venida!En su blog Obispo Ocupado [Occupied Bishop] Packard llamó más tarde a su comentario en la página de Facebook de La Trinidad “un exabrupto”, pero preguntaba: “¿No debería esta conversación estar vigente en la parroquia?OWS se describe a sí mismo como “un movimiento de resistencia sin líderes”. Pese a la ausencia de un campamento permanente, ha continuado organizando grupos de trabajo que se concentran en problemas particulares y reuniéndose en “asambleas generales” en distintos lugares de la ciudad.La Trinidad y OWS “usan dos clases de vocabularios diferentes” y los ocupas miran la “propiedad” desde un punto de vista totalmente distinto, dijo Packard el 14 de diciembre en una entrevista telefónica con ENS.“Ellos [OWS] creen en liberar la propiedad como parte de sus creencias fundamentales”, explicó.El movimiento ve la ocupación de un espacio a cielo abierto como “un símbolo de acción directa” tal como lo explicaban en el número de diciembre de 2011 de Tidal -una publicación de la teoría de la ocupación publicado en Medios de Difusión Ocupados [ Ocupied Media].La Iglesia Episcopal, mediante la participación directa y el apoyo ofrecido por clérigo y laicos y gracias al uso de sus iglesias y edificios, ha apoyado a OWS desde el principio.El Consejo Ejecutivo en su reunión de octubre aprobó una resolución (AN037) en la cual afirmaba “el creciente movimiento de protestas pacíficas en espacios públicos de Estados Unidos y a través del mundo en resistencia a la explotación de las personas por lucro o por poder da fiel testimonio en la tradición de Jesús  de las pecaminosas inequidades de la sociedad” y llama a los episcopales “a testificar en la tradición de Jesús de la inequidades de la sociedad”.En Boston, por ejemplo, los episcopales se cuentan entre un grupo de Capellanes de la Protesta, que mantuvieron una tienda de fe y espiritualidad para los ocupas de un campamento del centro. Luego del cierre de su campamento en la Plaza Dewey, la iglesia catedral de San Pablo en la  Diócesis de Massachusetts, comenzó a ofrecerles a los manifestantes de Ocupar Boston un espacio de reunión para sus asambleas generales, “a través de las cuales los participantes locales del movimiento llegaron a un consenso acerca de futuras acciones” a partir del 13 de diciembre, según una declaración publicada en la página web de la diócesis.La catedral, “se ha ofrecido a auspiciar la reunión de semana en semana, en la medida en que se necesite, y al hacerlo no respalda ningún punto de vista particular, sino que ‘respalda la conversación’, según el Muy Rdo. Jep Streit, deán de la catedral, decía el comunicado.Streit decía en ese comunicado que “los problemas que suscita el movimiento Ocupar merecen, por su importancia, ser discutidos en sociedad, y en consecuencia me siento feliz de ofrecer nuestra catedral para brindar hospitalidad y un lugar de manera que esas conversaciones puedan continuar”. Él hizo notar que percibía que  “la atención últimamente había pasado a la controversia sobre el acampamento de los que protestaban y se había distanciado de los problemas  cotidianos de justicia económica y social”.En Chicago, donde a los manifestante se les ha exigido que se mantengan en movimiento, la iglesia episcopal de La Gracia [Grace Episcopal Church] ha provisto alimento y espacio para dormir a los líderes del movimiento.“El deseo representado por Ocupar Wall Street de una restauración de la justicia y la equidad en nuestra sociedad es uno con el me siento totalmente solidario, y al que todos los cristianos deberían apoyar -y creo que debemos resaltar que la iglesia de La Trinidad ha respaldado vigorosamente a OWS desde su inicio”, dijo el obispo diocesano de Nueva York Mark S. Sisk en un declaración al respecto enviada por correo electrónico a ENS el 13 de diciembre.“Pero un rasgo típico de los movimientos que promueven cambios es su tendencia a ver las situaciones en blanco y negro: estás a favor de ellos o contra ellos”, escribió él. “Ésta es la dinámica que prevalece, me temo, respecto a la propiedad de Duarte -y que genera una gran cantidad de calor y muchísimo humo. Si la obligación legal de La Trinidad con su inquilino pesa más que su obligación con una visión de justicia como la que representa OWS es una pregunta que puede que no tenga una respuesta totalmente satisfactoria, es ciertamente una respuesta sobre la cual, creo yo, personas de buena voluntad pueden razonablemente discrepar.Además de atraer a ocupantes, activistas, partidarios y turistas, el campamento  del parque Zuccotti se convirtió en un imán para las personas sin vivienda, así como homosexuales [bisexuales y transexuales][LGBT] que habían abandonado sus hogares, que levantaban tiendas y recibían alimentos y atención médica. Durante la ocupación, la Trinidad puso a disposición de los manifestantes Charlotte’s Place como un refugio seguro para los ocupas: un lugar donde la gente podía tomarse un receso de la atmósfera de hacinamiento y de acoso periodístico del parque.Durante el período que siguió inmediatamente a la redada del 15 de noviembre, cuando, por orden del alcalde Michael Bloomberg, el Departamento de Policía de Nueva York despejó el parque y arrestó a unos 200 ocupantes, Charlotte’s Place, que está abierto desde el mediodía a las 6:00 P.M. los días hábiles, continuó sirviendo a los que protestaban y, por corto tiempo, quebrantó las reglas y dejó que algunas personas durmieran en el lugar.El 16 de noviembre, el arzobispo Bernard Ntahoturi, de la Iglesia Anglicana de Burundi -un país que está emergiendo luego de 12 años de guerra civil debido a causas étnicas- visitó la iglesia de La Trinidad y habló acerca de la reconciliación con los ocupas desplazados que se reunían en Charlotte’s Place.Charlotte’s Place sigue albergando de 150 a 200 personas diariamente, la mayoría de ellos ocupas, la mitad de ellos desamparados, dijo Jennifer Chinn, directora de programa, quien añadió que ella había permanecido neutral respecto a OWS, manteniéndose concentrada en la misión de Charlotte’s Place.“No se trata de una ideología; se trata de la acogida y la hospitalidad. No siempre es fácil. El ser acogedor se percibe como un desafío, y es entonces cuando uno sabe que está funcionando”, dijo ella. A veces, agregó, los ocupas han usado el espacio de reunión para organizarse contra La Trinidad y le han preguntado, desde un punto de vista personal, ‘¿Hacemos bien?’”Reconociendo la necesidad de servicios médicos y sociales, así como para personas sin hogar, La Trinidad contrató a la Rda. Mary Caliendo, una sacerdote de Wiccan que trabaja con  la clínica médica de los ocupas -que incluye médicos, enfermeros y psiquiatras- para trabajar en Charlotte’s Place y facilitar el cuidado.Una vez que se regó la voz de que había comida y servicios médicos gratuitos, la gente comenzó a aparecerse, dijo Caliendo.Los manifestantes desplazados incluyen a personas como Michael Morgan. Oriundo de Filadelfia, Morgan, de 42 años, vivió en las calles de Nueva York durante dos años. Él y su novia, Seida Safford, de 24 años, que está embarazada, vivieron en una tienda en el parque Zuccotti y ahora pasan noches en algunas iglesias. Al menos dos templos de la Iglesia Metodista Unida -uno en Park Slope, Brooklyn, y otro en el Upper West Side de Manhattan- siguen albergando a personas sin hogar que fueron desalojados del Zuccotti.Morgan y Safford han llegado a formar parte de un grupo de trabajo de personas sin hogar de los ocupas, tarea en la que intentan ayudar a otras personas desamparadas a tener acceso a los servicios que necesitan, dijo él el 12 de diciembre durante una entrevista con ENS en Charlotte’s Place.Sin un acampamento, dijo Morgan, él se siente aislado del movimiento.El 12 de diciembre también estaba en Charlotte’s Place Sonya Zink, quien es propietaria de una casa en Park Falls, Wisconsin, un pueblo de 2.000 habitantes. A ella la echaron de un trabajo de servicios sociales en 2009, trabajó en el censo de EE.UU. en 2010, pero ahora sigue desempleada, como le ocurre al 10 por ciento del pueblo donde vive.Zink comenzó a seguir el movimiento en abril cuando, a través de mensajes en Twitter, éste comenzó a formarse y salió a ser parte de los manifestantes el 17 de abril, Día de la Ira en EE.UU.,  y fecha en que nació el movimiento de los ocupas.Al igual que muchos otros, dijo, ella se sentía enojada con el gobierno de EE.UU.  “que rehúsa representar a su pueblo”.El parque era casi un microcosmos perfecto para el racismo, el clasismo y el privilegio presentes en la sociedad -toda la corrupción que OWS atacaba “se manifestaba en nuestro movimiento”, dijo Zink, añadiendo que su hincapié era llevar las voces de los marginados a la mesa.A pesar del desalojo, los manifestantes de OWS continuaron protestando, aunque no durmiendo, en el parque Zuccotti, que está rodeado de barreras de metal y custodiado las 24 horas por una compañía de seguridad privada.Zink por lo general toma el turno de la noche en el parque, afirmó.OWS no intenta recrear el campamento original en el parque Duarte y ha aprendido de sus pasados errores, dijo Paton, portavoz del movimiento.“La idea es tener una mejor dirección que la última ocupación”, explicó. “La gente no puede sencillamente venir a dormir; ellos tendrían que contribuir. Y porque sería una operación con acceso controlado las 24 horas donde la gente estaría viviendo en el lugar -no viviendo permanentemente, sino durmiendo en el espacio, no cubierto por tiendas- estaría muy orientada.En un bosquejo de 23 páginas, que incluye una versión hecha en computadora de la apariencia que tendría el campamento de un tercio de hectárea, en el que se incluiría un espacio abierto, espacio de reunión, tiendas, un cocina y baños, OWS creó una declaración de intenciones y una lista de acuerdos comunitarios -los cuales prohíben el uso de drogas o alcohol en el terreno.“Entendemos que la Iglesia tiene algunas preocupaciones respecto a la salud y a la seguridad”, dijo Paton. El movimiento tiene el plan de abordar esos problemas, y añadió que la preocupación más inmediata es la de la libertad de expresión y buscar el apoyo de la iglesia de La Trinidad en la lucha por la justicia al brindar un espacio que de otro modo es un solar vacío.El 15 de diciembre, líderes religiosos y activistas de OWS colocaron un “nacimiento guerrillero” frente a la iglesia de La Trinidad. La escena, que los activistas llamaron una “ofrenda de paz” muestra a José, María y Jesús dentro de una tienda de OWS con un letrero que dice: “Lucas 2:7 ‘No había lugar para ellos en el mesón’, pero con $10.000 millones en propiedad inmobiliaria, a la iglesia de La Trinidad le sobra lugar”.La iglesia posee 6 hectáreas y media de tierra en el barrio de Hudson Square y tiene medio millón de metros cuadrados de espacio de oficinas en su carpeta de bienes raíces, lo cual la hace uno de los más grandes propietarios de Manhattan. Sus propiedades ayudan a financiar sus obras sociales tanto localmente como en todo el mundo.—Lynette Wilson es editora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Sharon Sheridan, corresponsal de ENS, colaboró con este artículo. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Por Lynette WilsonPosted Dec 17, 2011 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET center_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

RIP: Joan P. Grimm Fraser, pioneering Episcopal priest

first_imgRIP: Joan P. Grimm Fraser, pioneering Episcopal priest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID May 26, 2016 at 11:33 pm Joan was my room mate at geology field camp the summer of 1975. She was a graduate student at University of Arizona in the Geosciences Dept. and I was an undergrad finishing my junior year. After our geo-tasks were done for the day, Joan tirelessly worked late into the evening on letters and narratives for support of women’s ordination. We all called her “The Rev.” On May 6, 1978, she presided at our marriage ceremony at Grace Episcopal Church in Tucson, where she was serving. There were so few women priests at that time — and not that many female geologists, either! When people asked my husband and I about our wedding, we enjoyed watching their faces when we told them we were married by my college room mate. We are still married… Joan was and continues to be an inspiration to so many of us for her brilliance, gentleness and determination! I have since been ordained a Deacon in the Episcopal Church and am grateful for her leadership. May light perpetual shine upon her. May 26, 2016 at 1:18 pm I met her last year at CSW59. She was such a loving , caring and helpful person . She promised to come and visit me at Jordan . May her Soul rest in peace . I am sure She Will be missed among her family and friends. People An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Rev. Alejandra Trillos says: Obituary, Comments (7) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Jackie Pittman says: Press Release Service Frances Holliday says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC The Rev. Joan P. Grimm Fraser[Episcopal Diocese of Long Island] The Rev. Joan P. Grimm Fraser, an Episcopal priest and leading spokesperson on women’s issues in church and society has died.Mother Joan recently represented the Episcopal Church and the International Atlantic Province (Province II) of the Episcopal Church on the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women.The province includes six dioceses in New York, two dioceses in New Jersey and the off-shore dioceses of Haiti, the Virgin Islands and the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe. About the UNCSW she had said, “It is an opportunity to give a voice to women here and abroad who don’t have a voice” about health, poverty and justice.The Rt. Rev. Lawrence C. Provenzano, bishop of Long Island, said, “Each of us will miss Joan’s great spirit and faithful, thoughtful counsel. She was a pioneer in our church and one of the wisest, most faithful priests I have ever known.”There will be a Requiem Eucharist May 27 at 11 am, at the Cathedral of the Incarnation, Garden City, New York. Provenzano will preside.The Fraser family has provided the following biographical details.The Rev. Joan P. Grimm Fraser, one of the first women ordained in the Episcopal Church, and a geologist, has died at the age of 68. Mother Joan, as she was known to parishioners at Holy Trinity Parish in Hicksville, New York where she served as rector since 2004, was admired throughout the church as a kind and loving priest who blazed a trail for other women.Born in Berea, Ohio in 1947, Fraser graduated from Allegheny College in 1969 with a B.S. Later that same year she entered the Episcopal Theological Seminary (ETS) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, as the only woman in her class. She graduated with a Master’s of Divinity in 1973, and was the first woman ordained a transitional deacon in the Diocese of Ohio in 1973. She was the 33rd woman ordained a transitional deacon in the nation.Mother Joan had been invited to be one of the women who came to be known as the “Philadelphia Eleven,” who were ordained in 1974 in “irregular” fashion prior to authorization by the General Convention of the Episcopal Church for the ordination of women to the priesthood. However, continuing her lifelong practice of abiding faithfully by the decisions of her church, and obeying her bishop, Fraser declined to be one of the very first women ordained priest, and chose instead to serve as deacon at that historic mass.She served as the associate chaplain at Kenyon College in Ohio from 1974-1976. She was the first woman formally approved by the Diocese of Ohio to be “regularly” ordained priest in 1977. Her deliberate care and intentionality led to her being the second woman ordained to the priesthood in Ohio. Many women throughout the U.S. were ordained in January of 1977, as soon as it was permitted within the Episcopal Church. Fraser had committed to being ordained priest in the chapel at Kenyon at a time when the students could participate. That delay meant being ordained priest in March of 1977. Mother Joan was thus one of the first 50 women regularly ordained to the priesthood in the Episcopal Church. The Rt. Rev. John Burt ordained her both deacon and priest.Following her ordination, it was nearly impossible for a woman priest to obtain paying work, let alone full-time paying work. After her ordination, at her bishop’s urging, and with financial support from the Diocese of Ohio, Fraser obtained an M.S. in Geology from the University of Arizona in 1978.She served full-time as a petroleum geologist for Amoco Production Co. from 1978-1985. Throughout her long and varied life in the church, Mother Joan frequently took lower paying, part-time or even non-paying jobs so as to be able to serve the church in an environment where women were not always considered desirable candidates for clergy positions. She was known for her cheerful disposition and her wise acceptance of the role she played as a trailblazer for others. She told many younger clergy she mentored that it was her delight to serve as a “doorknob” for other women participating in the life and ministry of the church.Throughout her long career Fraser served parishes in Ohio, Colorado (where she was the first full-time, fully-stipended female priest), North Carolina, Western Massachusetts (where she served as Canon at Christ Cathedral), New York City, and Long Island. She was appointed by the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church to be the 2015 Anglican Delegate to the UN Commission on the Status of Women.Mother Joan married Ross Fraser, director of planning at the Nassau University Medical Center, in 1979. He survives her, along with six godchildren, countless cousins, and many other family and friends. Among her friends and family, she was known as a gracious, wonderful hostess, cook and artist. At the time of her death, complex negotiations were being carried out for the sharing of her secret chocolate sauce recipe. In addition to her many other accomplishments she obtained a BFA in Design from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 1999.Memorial gifts may be sent to the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society for the benefit of the Joan Grimm Fraser UNCSW Legacy Fund, 815 Second Avenue, New York, NY 10017.Editor’s note: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated the year of the Philadelphia Eleven ordinations. It was 1974, not 1976. Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments are closed. Featured Events Reem El Far says: Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Right Reverend Dean E. Wolfe says: Tags Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group May 26, 2016 at 2:50 am I met Joan Grimm Fraser in 1985 when she served as the first full-time, fully-stipended female priest in my home parish in Lakewood, Colorado. The first time I saw Joan celebrate the Eucharist it took my breath away. When I was a teenager I had the sense that I was supposed to serve God in the Episcopal Church as a priest. That was not possible in the 1960s. Joan truly opened the door for many of us to follow in her footsteps. My husband and I have been close friends with Ross and Joan since 1985. Reading her obituary explains the ache that I feel in my heart and the gratitude I have for the love and support she’s given me over the years. In December I will celebrate the 18th anniversary of my ordination to the priesthood. Joan attended my ordination. Joan’s many stories will be missed but I hope that her secret chocolate sauce recipe does not disappear. Rest in peace my friend. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC May 27, 2016 at 1:40 pm I met Joan when I served at Trinity Church in the City of Boston. She was a very genuine and warm person and an exceptionally faithful priest. She had a creative and wonderful ministry and she will be deeply, deeply missed. May she rest in eternal peace and rise in incomparable glory. May 28, 2016 at 11:53 am Joan was a kindred spirit. One of her passions was to support newly ordained clergy. I would never forget her ongoing support in every ministry I was part in the Diocese of Long Island. She will be missed but her kindred spirit will last forever. Gratitude to Mother Joan always. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Rev. Debra Angell says: May 26, 2016 at 4:40 am The irregular ordinations happened July 29, 1974. Just a correction to the date in the article. Glenda M. Empsall says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Posted May 25, 2016 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI May 26, 2016 at 4:29 pm One of my favorite memories of Joan is hearing her explanation of why she didn’t tediously wipe out the chalice and paten after the Eucharist. This account came one night after one of her famous dinners when I asked could I help clean up. She told me that just like in church, she didn’t wash the dishes with company around the table. She was the gracious host, whether at the Holy Table or the dinner table. Thank you for coming into our lives. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT last_img read more

El Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal respalda a Roca…

first_imgEl Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal respalda a Roca Enhiesta ‘La vieja cruz rugosa’ en la raída bandera de la Iglesia fue la ‘imagen definitoria” de la reunión Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Indigenous Ministries, Executive Council, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events El obispo primado Michael Curry predica el 21 de octubre en la iglesia de Cristo en New Brunswick, Nueva Jersey, mientras la Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, escucha. La iglesia está a corta distancia de donde se reúne el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal. Los miembros del Consejo se unieron a la congregación de la iglesia de Cristo para la eucaristía. A la derecha de Curry se encuentra la bandera de la Iglesia Episcopal que ondeó en el campamento [de protesta] del Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas en Dakota del Norte. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – New Brunswick, Nueva Jersey] El Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia episcopal pidió el 22 de octubre que los agentes de la fuerza pública “disminuyeran la provocación militar y policial en los campamentos, y en sus cercanías, de los que protestan pacíficamente [contra] el proyecto del Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas”.La petición se produjo en el texto de una resolución que el Consejo aprobó al término de su reunión de tres días aquí. Un resumen de las resoluciones aprobadas por el Consejo se encuentra aquí.La resolución del Consejo sobre el oleoducto de las Dakotas sigue al apoyo brindado por el obispo primado Michael Curry tanto de palabra como en su presencia con los manifestantes.El Rdo. John Floberg, miembro del Consejo y sacerdote supervisor de las iglesias episcopales del lado de Dakota del Norte de [la reserva india de] Roca Enhiesta, dijo el 21 de octubre ante el Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre de Promoción Social e Interconexiones para la Misión que la manera en que se ha llevado a cabo la protesta ha sido “la experiencia más impactante que yo haya tenido en mis 25 años en Roca Enhiesta” Y, sin embargo, él dijo que se había sentido perturbado por las respuestas racistas que la protesta había generado en otros lugares del estado.El ministerio de la Iglesia Episcopal a los que protestaban abrió lo que él llamó “la ventana evangélica del evangelio” entre las iglesias cristianas y los nativoamericanos “versus todo el racismo tan feo que ha suscitado en Dakota del Norte”.El Rdo. John Floberg, miembro del Consejo y proveniente de Dakota del Norte, dice el 21 de octubre ante el comité de Promoción Social e Interconexiones para la Misión que la acción de la Nación Sioux de Roca Enhiesta contra el proyecto del Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas está plagado de tensiones así como lleno de gracia. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Floberg le dijo al comité que la respuesta de la fuerza pública ha sido provocadora y que casi llega a la ley marcial. Dijo haber visto a agentes con sus armas al hombro contra grupos devotos de mujeres y niños que protestaban.“Va a dar lugar a una muerte” si la respuesta no da un paso atrás, afirmó.La resolución del Consejo llama al presidente Barack Obama, al gobernador de Dakota del Norte, a los senadores y representantes de Dakota del Norte, al Departamento de Justicia de EE.UU. y al departamento del alguacil del Condado de Morton a tomar inmediatamente todas las medidas necesarias para disminuir la provocación militar y policial en los campamentos. [La resolución] encomia al Consejo Tribal de los Sioux de Roca Enhiesta y a su jefe y a la tribu sioux del río Cheyenne y a su consejo por su “presencia devota y no violenta”.La resolución encomia también a las diócesis de Dakota del Norte y Dakota del Sur por el apoyo de su liderazgo a la respuesta de la nación sioux “a la intrusión corporativa y gubernamental en su suelo sagrado”; a los asociados ecuménicos e interreligiosos que se han unido al ministerio de la Iglesia Episcopal allí, a la Iglesia Anglicana del Canadá y a las diócesis episcopales que han ofrecido apoyo moral y económico.La resolución pide a la Iglesia Episcopal en todos los niveles que apoye devota y económicamente el programado campamento de invierno, el cual, dice, es el “derecho de la nación sioux a la reunión y protesta pacíficas”.“Esta bandera ha ondeado tan orgullosamente” en parte porque fue la única bandera de una iglesia cristiana en el campamento del Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas, en Dakota del Norte, dijo el Rdo. John Floberg a Mark Duffy, archivero canónico de la Iglesia Episcopal, a la derecha, al entregarle la bandera a su cuidado. “Y lamentamos entregarla”, agregó Floberg con la voz quebrada. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.El día de clausura de la reunión, Floberg presentó a los Archivos de la Iglesia Episcopal con sede en Austin, Texas, la bandera, actualmente raída, de la Iglesia Episcopal que ondeó durante meses en el Oceti Skowin de Dakota del Norte. La bandera, dijo él, fue la única bandera de una Iglesia cristiana entre las 300 banderas de naciones tribales que flamearon sobre el campamento de protesta pacífica.El 21 de octubre, la bandera fue parte de la Santa Eucaristía en la histórica iglesia de Cristo [Christ Church] situada en las inmediaciones. A principio del oficio, la bandera colgaba cerca de una tarja conmemorativa de Abraham Beach, quinto presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, en los primeros años del siglo XIX, y rector de la iglesia de Cristo; y luego, durante la Gran Plegaria Eucarística, la bandera fue llevada al altar.Una de las primeras reuniones organizativas de lo que ahora se conoce como Iglesia Episcopal tuvo lugar en la iglesia de Cristo. Durante una conferencia de prensa en el receso del almuerzo del 22 de octubre, la actual presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, vinculó a esos organizadores con los que ahora ministran en la reserva sioux de Roca Enhiesta.“Fueron realmente valientes, anglicanos progresistas y patriotas tratando de solucionar como ser la Iglesia en un nuevo país de una manera nueva”, dijo ella, yuxtaponiendo sus esfuerzos [de estos fundadores] con los de los miembros de la Iglesia en las Dakotas que están ahora “siendo episcopales de una manera nueva, valerosa y audaz” y que “están tratando de solucionar exactamente lo mismo”.Curry dijo que la bandera episcopal, con lo que ahora es una “vieja cruz rugosa” desecha a la mitad, había estado en el campamento de Oceti Skowin Camp como un “testimonio visible de en lo que consiste la cruz: los brazos extendidos de Jesús que reflejan el amor de Dios y que ahora se extienden hasta llegar a Roca Enhiesta, extendiéndose para que todo el mundo sea tratado como un hijo de Dios, extendiéndose para que nosotros cuidemos de la creación de Dios”.Y, afirmó curry, que “la vieja y gastada bandera episcopal” era la “imagen definitoria” de esta reunión del Consejo y de su labor en torno a la reconciliación racial y la evangelización.Durante la conferencia de prensa del 22 de octubre, Curry dijo que la Iglesia Episcopal asumió una postura respecto al proyecto del Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas no debido a la cuestión de si el petróleo debía usarse o no como una fuente de energía. “El problema aquí es que se tomaron decisiones que afectan adversamente a comunidades nativas —la reserva sioux misma— cuando puede haber otros medios alternativos para llevar a cabo la misma cosa”.La bandera de la Iglesia Episcopal que ondeó sobre el campamento de protesta por el Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas se muestra plegada para su traslado a los Archivos de la Iglesia Episcopal en Austin, Texas, junto con unas notas del Rdo. John Floberg sobre su presentación de la bandera. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Las decisiones implicaban si el proceso de evaluación medioambiental se llevó a cabo debidamente y si Estados Unidos respetó los derechos de los sioux como una nación soberana.Curry dijo sentirse contento de que los departamentos federales de Justicia y del Interior, así como el Cuerpo de Ingenieros del Ejército de EE.UU., habían ordenado que la construcción se suspendiera a 32 kilómetros al este y a 32 kilómetros al oeste del río Misurí, de manera que esas decisiones podían revisarse. El oleoducto debe pasar por debajo del río, que es la única fuente de agua de la reserva.La participación de la Iglesia Episcopal en la protesta se afianza en su repudio —de 2009— de la Doctrina del Descubrimiento, explicó Curry. “Parte de esta acción fue decir que hemos logrado encontrar maneras de ser más justas y equitativas en la relación con nuestros hermanos y hermanas de las comunidades nativas de nuestro país”, añadió el Obispo Primado.La protesta por el oleoducto, señaló él, es un modo de llamar a las personas a dar un paso atrás y examinar cuál es “la mejor manera, la más sensible y más prudente” de abordar las necesidades energéticas de la nación. Curry enfatizó que él fue a la nación de Roca Enhiesta a petición de los episcopales que participaron en la acción.“Creo realmente que esto no es una cosa de partidos. No es una cosa liberal o conservadora. No es algo republicano o demócrata. Esto es una cosa humana, algo de Jesús que tiene que ver con lo que es justo para todos los hijos de Dios”, apuntó él. “Me complace que nuestro gobierno está tratando de llegar a entender lo que es”El Consejo Ejecutivo se reunió en el Hotel Heldrich en New Brunswick, Nueva Jersey. Otros artículos de ENS sobre la reunión de New Brunswick se encuentran aquí.El Consejo Ejecutivo lleva a cabo los programas y políticas adoptadas por la Convención General, según el Canon I.4 (1). El Consejo está compuesto de 38 miembros, 20 de los cuales (cuatro obispos, cuatro presbíteros o diáconos y 12 laicos) son elegidos por la Convención General, y 18 por los nueve sínodos provinciales (un clérigo y un laico cada uno) por períodos de seis años, además del Obispo Primado y el Presidente de la Cámara de Diputados [que son miembros ex oficio].Además, el vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados, el Secretario, el Director de Operaciones, el Tesorero y Director de Finanzas tienen asiento y voz, pero no voto. – La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Dakota Access Pipeline, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Executive Council October 2016, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 22, 2016 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Advocacy Peace & Justice, Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Standing Rock last_img read more

Conference on Anglican reconciliation efforts puts divisions in historical, theological…

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Conference on Anglican reconciliation efforts puts divisions in historical, theological context Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Several dozen clergy members, professors, students and lay people attended this week’s “Living Sacrifice” conference at Nashotah House Theological Seminary in Nashotah, Wisconsin. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Nashotah, Wisconsin] The Anglican Communion and the Episcopal Church have wrestled with pointed internal divisions for more than a decade, leading some to identify this as a “broken” communion. The path forward, as described to the dozens attending a conference here this week, first will require looking backward, as well as further inward.“We didn’t want to try and present the idea of division as if it was a recent phenomenon,” said the Rev. Andrew Grosso, associate dean for academic affairs at Nashotah House Theological Seminary.Instead, Nashotah House teamed up with the Living Church Foundation to host this week’s conference, “Living Sacrifices: Repentance, Reconciliation and Renewal,” to illuminate the deeper historical and theological context of recent Anglican divisions.“Our conviction is, to resolve Anglican differences and disagreements, we need to go back to older and richer discussions about the nature of the church, what is the church, in scripture and in history, and ecumenically,” Living Church Foundation Executive Director Christopher Wells said.The four-day conference that ended June 9 drew 50 to 75 attendees – a mix of clergy, professors, students and lay people interested in the topic – to this 175-year-old Episcopal seminary in rural Wisconsin. Grosso and Wells said they hoped attendees will take what they’ve learned and incorporate these resources for healing into their churches, their classrooms and their conversations with other Christians.Often divisive topics hinder conversation. Wells alluded to the conference’s opening presentation June 6 by Archbishop Josiah Idowu-Fearon, the Anglican Communion secretary general, who noted that Anglicans and Episcopalians sometimes find it easier to talk to other Christian denominations than to establish internal dialogue.Ecumenical dialogue was a specific focus of the conference’s first full day, June 7, including a presentation by Sister Susan Wood, a Roman Catholic nun who teaches systematic theology at Marquette University in Milwaukee.Another Marquette professor, the Rev. Michael Cover, kicked off the presentations June 8 with a detailed analysis of Paul’s letter to the Romans, which supplied the name of the conference, “Living Sacrifices.” Cover, a New Testament professor, said the Anglican Communion is in a “Romans moment,” highlighting both the Communion’s missional character and its historical connection to Rome.The concept of the Christian church in a constant state of movement underpinned the conference’s marquee presentation, by the Rev. Ephraim Radner, a pre-eminent conservative Episcopal theologian.The Rev. Ephraim Radner, professor at Wycliffe College in Toronto, speak June 8 at the “Living Sacrifice” at Nashotah House.For Radner, a professor of historical theology at Toronto’s Wycliffe College, Christianity has never been fixed to one place, geographically or theologically, but constantly moving and evolving, and “each church … cannot possibly ever be the definitive referent of the finished work of God.”The proposal he laid out in his presentation was the formation of a new Anglican synod, a communion-wide body empowered to initiate voluntary faith conversations that would seek common ground on spiritual issues across the Anglican Communion. He compared participation in this synod to the United Nations – certain countries may diverge from others on issues like climate change, but they remain in the UN.“Communion is a common dynamic that Christians follow together as they are in fact changed by God,” Radner said. “Communion then is a path, not a place. It is a road, not a locality. But of course, it’s a road together.”Nashotah House and The Living Church typically come at these issues from a more traditional perspective, and Wells argued that conservative Episcopalians are “in a perfect place to host a discussion about reconciliation” because of the fact they remain in the Episcopal Church, in contrast with other groups that sought to split from the church over the ordination of women and, more directly, the election of the Rt. Rev. Gene Robinson in 2003 as the church’s first openly gay bishop.That recent history informs much of the current talk about divisions in the Anglican Communion, though Garwood Anderson, a professor at Nashotah House, told Episcopal News Service between presentations this week that when seeking answers in the church’s historical context, Christians should not forget the church’s origins, in which Jesus’ early followers faced persecution simply for practicing their faith.“The early Christians didn’t have that luxury (of debating ecclesiological divisions). They were trying to make their way in the world,” said Anderson, who would speak on that topic on the conference’s final day.Those early Christians may have something to teach today’s church about renewal, now that Christians, particularly in the United States, have become a cultural minority, Anderson said.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC June 10, 2017 at 8:01 am Reconciliation opens the doors for true spiritual growth for all who are willing to accept reconciliation while seeking spiritual growth. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments (4) New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tom Rightmyer says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service By David PaulsenPosted Jun 9, 2017 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Comments are closed. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events June 10, 2017 at 2:21 pm If Christianiy as a faith movement continues to transcend culture without ceasing to be human then I think we have a shot at reconciliation , not only within world wide Anglicanism but also within Eucharistic “full open communion” conversations.Rev. J. Kent BerryCentral Texas Conference / UMC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Donald Heacock says: Anglican Communion M. Littlefield says: Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ June 9, 2017 at 8:21 pm The conduct of Bishop Curry & leader Gay Jennings is clearly align themselves with the far left in the name of Jesus. The reduction of N T to a political ideology is more than tragic. It is an exegesis that is down right fundementalist. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC June 9, 2017 at 8:25 pm Glad to see some interest in discussions among separated Anglican brothers. I was privileged to be part of a 2001-2003 three session series between the Episcopal Church and the Reformed Episcopal Church and the Anglican Province of America with Bishop Salmon and others. I see little energy for continuing dialogue, but as I read the Chicago-Lambeth Quadrilateral I find no mention of attitudes about sex as a church dividing issue. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL John Kent Berry says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

En eventos asociados a la Marcha por Nuestras Vidas, episcopales…

first_img Submit an Event Listing Por David PaulsenPosted Mar 21, 2018 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Faith & Politics, Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Gun Violence March 2018, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Representantes de Day One, una agrupación sin fines de lucro para el empoderamiento de jóvenes, se reúnen con miembros de un grupo de jóvenes de la iglesia episcopal de Todos los Santos, en Pasadena, California, para un adiestramiento en activismo y cabildeo políticos. Miembros del grupo de jóvenes viajarán esta semana a Washington, D.C. para participar en la Marcha por Nuestras Vidas el 24 de marzo. Foto Juliana Serrano/Todos los Santos/Pasadena.[Episcopal News Service] Miembros de la Iglesia Episcopal y líderes episcopales de todos los EE.UU. viajan a Washington, D.C. esta semana para participar en la Marcha por Nuestras vidas el 24 de marzo, mientras otros se proponen asistir a las manifestaciones locales que se centran en un mensaje compartido: algo debe hacerse para frenar la violencia armada, especialmente contra los jóvenes.Los episcopales que asisten a la marcha de Washington o a las marchas en otras ciudades se les insta a usar las almohadillas [hashtags] #MarchEpiscopal y #episcopal cuando publiquen algo en las redes sociales desde los eventos, y a seguir las actualizaciones del 24 de marzo en Episcopal News Service.Los preparativos ya están en marcha. En Chicago, un grupo de jóvenes episcopales pasó la noche del 20 diseñando las pancartas que llevarán consigo a la marcha de Washington. Miembros de la iglesia episcopal de Todos los Santos [All Saints] de Pasadena, California, se levantarán temprano el 22 de marzo para enviar a un grupo de jóvenes por vía aérea a Washington. Y en Upper Montclair, Nueva Jersey, los líderes de la iglesia están dándole los toque finales a un monumento temporal a las víctimas de dos masacres escolares.“Esto no es política”, dijo la Rda. Melissa Hall, rectora de la iglesia episcopal de Santiago Apóstol [Church of St. James] en Montclair. “Sencillamente amamos a nuestros niños y queremos mantenerlos a salvo”.El monumento de la iglesia de Santiago Apóstol consiste en camisetas colgadas en postes [de metal en forma de T] frente a la iglesia. De un lado del patio de la iglesia, hay 17 camisetas, una por cada uno de los estudiantes y adultos asesinados el 14 de febrero en la masacre de la secundaria de Parkland, Florida, que ha provocado el movimiento de jóvenes que está detrás de la Marcha por Nuestras Vidas. Del otro lado del patio de la iglesia, otras 26 camisetas recuerdan a los niños y educadores que murieron en la escuela primaria de Sandy Hook en Newtown, Connecticut, en 2012.A Hall y a la Rda. Audrey Hasselbrook, rectora auxiliar de Santiago Apóstol, se les ocurrió la idea del monumento días después de la masacre de Parkland mientras se preguntaban qué podrían hacer respecto a la violencia armada. “Nos pusimos a pensar y dijimos, ¿cuántas veces más podemos predicar acerca de esto?”, contó Hall.Además del monumento conmemorativo, Santiago Apóstol tendrá un oficio vespertino y una vigilia con velas a las 5: P.M. del 24 de marzo. Aunque al margen de las marchas que se han planeado en todo el país, la iglesia mostrará su solidaridad con la causa cantando himnos, uniéndose en oración y doblando su campana por las víctimas de la violencia armada.Episcopales de numerosas diócesis han organizado viajes en autobús a Washington, D.C. para asistir a la principal Marcha por Nuestras Vidas. Mark Beckwith, el obispo de la Diócesis de Newark, que se unirá a un convoy de seis autobuses organizado por el Ministerio de Defensa Social Luterano Episcopal de Nueva Jersey, se lamentaba del “azote de la violencia armada” en un artículo de blog del 21 de marzo.“Voy a Washington este sábado en parte a responder al fervor de los jóvenes, pero más que eso, y más profundo que eso, voy a seguir a Jesús —quien, con su compromiso inquebrantable con la no violencia, irrumpía con frecuencia en los círculos de poder que condonaban, si no fomentaban, la violencia”, dijo Beckwith.Beckwith, uno de los obispos episcopales convocantes del grupo Obispos Unidos Contra la Violencia Armada, percibía “una corriente de apoyo” para reformar [la legislación] de las armas, tal como el aumento de la edad legal para portar armas, expandir las verificaciones de antecedentes para la compra de armas y prohibir cierta clase de fusiles de asalto. También se hizo eco de la “elocuencia y la indignación” de los estudiantes de la escuela secundaria Marjory Stoneman Douglas de Parkland a raíz del la masacre ocurrida en su escuela.Él recurrió al relato de la entrada de Jesús en Jerusalén el Domingo de Ramos como un modelo para desafiar las estructuras de poder que perpetúan la injusticia.“Su testimonio perdura, y yo creo que nos proponemos aprovechar su ejemplo y seguirlo, de manera no violenta, en este cambiante abismo cultural”, expresó Beckwith. “Y no rendirse, y no detenerse”.Beckwith y muchos otros episcopales que viajan a Washington se proponen asistir a una vigilia interreligiosa en la Catedral Nacional de Washington el 23 de marzo. La Diócesis de Washington está ayudando a organizar alojamiento para algunos de los que vienen de fuera, y la diócesis también está coordinando con sus miembros para desfilar como grupo por la Ave. Pennsylvania hasta el Capitolio durante la Marcha por Nuestras Vidas.“No estamos solos en esta tarea”, dijo la obispa de Washington Mariann Budde en un artículo de blog acerca de la marcha que apareció en febrero. “La conciencia del país se ha despertado y las personas de todos los sectores, de muchas creencias y de todos los puntos del espectro político están respondiendo”.Adolescentes episcopales se encuentran entre la oleada de jóvenes que están respondiendo, quienes se han pronunciado contra la violencia armada y ayudan a organizar las manifestaciones en respuesta a la masacre de Parkland, y quienes estarán a la vanguardia de las próximas marchas.El grupo de formación episcopal FORMA ha preparado una guía para llevar a los jóvenes a las protestas o marchas como las programadas para el 24 de marzo. La Iglesia Episcopal también ofrece reglas generales para viajar con jóvenes.La iglesia de Todos los Santos [All Saints] en Pasadena está enviando a Washington, para participar en la marcha, a un grupo de 10 jóvenes junto con su director de la juventud, Jeremy Langili, y su rector, el Rdo. Mike Kinman. El viaje fue posible gracias de los miembros y amigos de la congregación, dijo la Rda. Susan Russell, principal rectora asociada para las comunicaciones en Todos los Santos.Ellos también se reunirán el 23 de marzo en el Capitolio con miembros del personal de la representante Judy Chu, demócrata por California que representa a Pasadena. Otros miembros del grupo de jóvenes que permanecerán en California se proponen reunirse con Chu en persona en su oficina del distrito el mismo día.Day One, una agrupación para el empoderamiento de los jóvenes, se reunió con el grupo de jóvenes este mes para adiestrarlos en el cabildeo de los legisladores, al tiempo que les explicaban qué esperar durante las reuniones, dijo Russell.“Estamos trabajando con nuestros jóvenes para equiparlos a fin de amplificar sus voces como parte de la Marcha por Nuestras Vidas”, explicó.En la iglesia episcopal de Todos los Santos [All Saints Episcopal Church] en Chicago, algunos de los jóvenes que viajarán a Washington, D.C., se reunieron el 20 de marzo para hacer pancartas contra la violencia. Todos los Santos se ha asociado con otras cuatro congregaciones episcopales de la diócesis para alquilar dos autobuses para el viaje. Alrededor de 110 personas saldrá el viernes por la noche, desfilarán el sábado y estarán de regreso a tiempo para el culto del Domingo de Ramos, dijo la Rda. Bonnie Perry, rectora de Todos los Santos.“Esto es igual que Jesús yendo a la capital. Es por eso que realmente queríamos ir al D.C.”, dijo Perry, haciéndose eco de la referencia al Domingo de Ramos bíblico de Beckwith. “Se trata de una peregrinación. Es una peregrinación espiritual. Esto es lo que somos llamados a hacer”.Viajar a la capital de la nación no es el único medio de participar. El obispo de Chicago Jeffrey Lee hizo un llamado a su diócesis a participar, si no yendo a la marcha de Washington, marchando con él en Chicago o estando con los manifestantes en espíritu.“Dondequiera que estén, rueguen que Dios consuele, sostenga y sane a todos aquellos cuyas vidas ha alcanzado la violencia armada, y que Dios hará evidente la obra que estamos llamados a hacer para ponerle fin a este azote”, afirmó Lee.Ese y otros empeños dirigidos por episcopales en la jornada del 24 de marzo se incluyen en una lista compilada por Obispos Unidos Contra la Violencia. He aquí algunos otros hitos:El obispo Daniel Gutiérrez de la Diócesis de Pensilvania, invita a los manifestantes a acudir a una bendición el 23 de marzo en un oficio en la iglesia episcopal de San Esteban [St. Stephen’s] en Filadelfia en honor de Oscar Romero, un arzobispo salvadoreño de la Iglesia Católica Romana que combatió la injusticia social y económica hasta que fue asesinado mientras decía misa el 24 de marzo de 1980. Algunos episcopales de la diócesis tienen planes de asistir a las marchas en Filadelfia y Washington.Los obispos de la Diócesis de Virginia dijeron en una declaración del 21 de marzo que habían “decidido pasar el sábado con jóvenes y otras personas de nuestras congregaciones y comunidades para decirle no a la violencia armada. Nos reunimos con propietarios de armas responsables y con otras personas que tienen una amplia variedad de puntos de vista sobre las armas de fuego. No nos pronunciamos contra la tenencia responsable de armas, sino contra una idolatría de las armas que ha causado ruina y destrucción devastadoras dentro de nuestras fronteras. Invitamos a las personas de esta diócesis a unirse para decirle no a la violencia y sí a la vida”. El obispo diocesano Shannon Johnston marchará en Richmond, la obispa sufragánea Susan Goff estará en la marcha de Charlottesville y los obispos auxiliares Bob Ihloff y Ted Gulick tomarán parte en los eventos de Washington, D.C.La Diócesis de Indianápolis y la iglesia catedral de Cristo [Christ Church Cathedral] auspician un viaje en autobús para la marcha en Washington, aunque la obispa Jennifer Baskerville-Burrows participará con los episcopales en el evento de la Marcha por Nuestras Vidas en Indianápolis. El obispo Douglas Sparks de la Diócesis de Indiana Norte también conducirá un grupo de episcopales a la marcha de Indianápolis.Otros obispos están invitando a los episcopales de sus diócesis a que se les unan en las marchas locales. El obispo de la Diócesis de Rochester, Prince Singh, se propone asistir a la marcha en Rochester, Nueva York; en tanto el obispo de California Norte, Barry Beisner, participará en la marcha en Sacramento. El obispo provisional de Carolina del Sur, Skip Adams, se propone estar en la marcha de North Charleston; y el obispo de la Diócesis de Massachusetts Occidental, Douglas Fisher, asistirá a la marcha en Northampton.La catedral episcopal de Boston se ha convertido en una especie de centro de hospitalidad y adiestramiento para los manifestantes en esa ciudad. La iglesia catedral de San Pablo [St Paul] en Boston planea servir como lugar de reunión de los participantes en la Marcha por Nuestras Vidas en esa ciudad a partir de las 10:00 A.M. La reunión ofrecerá entrenamiento y otras actividades organizativas al grupo encabezado por jóvenes antes de que salga para la marcha al final de la mañana.La Diócesis de Connecticut está celebrando un evento matutino Capacitar y empoderar a las mujeres de Dios: un camino a seguir, en reconocimiento al Día Internacional de la Mujer. Cuando concluya el evento en la catedral de Hartford, a las 12:30 P.M., los participantes serán invitados a unirse a una procesión hasta el capitolio estatal para participar en la Marcha por Nuestras Vidas en Hartford.La obispa DeDe Duncan-Probe, de la Diócesis de Nueva York Central, tiene planes de asistir a la Marcha por Nuestras vidas en Syracuse. Ella ventiló las respuestas cristianas a la violencia armada en un vídeo en directo en Facebook el 20 de marzo.“Nuestra fe nos llama a defender y proteger a nuestros niños, los más vulnerables entre nosotros. Jesús nos dice, ‘dejen que los niños se acerquen a mí’ que los niños estarían seguros y protegidos. ¿Cómo pues hacemos eso? ¿Cómo lo entendemos?”, dijo Duncan-Probe. “Es hora de escuchar a los vulnerables y de ser vulnerables, de escuchar a nuestros niños y de ser conducidos por ellos”.– David Paulsen es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Pueden dirigirse a él en [email protected] Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Advocacy Peace & Justice, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group En eventos asociados a la Marcha por Nuestras Vidas, episcopales de todos los EE.UU. se preparan para manifestarse contra la violencia armadacenter_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth & Young Adults Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishops United Against Gun Violence, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Gun Violence, Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

Growing dental care ministry has roots in Tennessee cathedral’s outreach…

first_imgGrowing dental care ministry has roots in Tennessee cathedral’s outreach to struggling women Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC June 9, 2018 at 9:34 am My husband is a soon to be retired dentist. We have 3 dental chairs to donate if anyone is interested Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Georgiana Vines says: Judy yodd says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls By David PaulsenPosted Jun 7, 2018 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Larry Waters says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bruce Walker says: Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA June 7, 2018 at 10:29 pm Simply outstanding. Ministry happens when you put skills together with big hearts and seek to serve others as Jesus showed us and instructed us to do. Being a dentist and priest, I am grateful, proud and inspired by your ministry. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Comments (4) Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET June 7, 2018 at 10:01 pm This is absolutely wonderful! And all because people cared and did not expect or wait on government aid. My mother would have benefitted from this caring group. Blessings on all of you. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET June 9, 2018 at 5:47 pm Thank you for doing this story. Dr. Borole, her staff, Pattie Thiele and Friends of St. John’s deserve the recognition. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Smiles for Hope, led by Dr. Smita Borole, center, is a nonprofit providing free dental care in Knoxville, Tennessee, that grew out of outreach by St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral to the YWCA and the work of congregation member Pattie Thiel, front left. They pose here with other Smiles for Hope volunteers. Photo: Smiles for Hope[Episcopal News Service] Sometimes outreach can take on a life of its own. That’s the case at St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral in Knoxville, Tennessee, where the congregation’s decade of support for the local YWCA sprouted a dental care ministry that has grown into a nonprofit organization with a model that leaders hope can be replicated around the country.“There’s not much in the way of free dental care in this country,” said Pattie Thiel, a member of St. John’s and one of the lead volunteers with Smiles for Hope. “There’s free health care if you need it, but not free dental care.”Smiles for Hope started with the idea that dental care was nearly as important as medical care for people living on the economic margins. In a little over two years, the ministry has provided an estimated $200,000 in pro bono dental work, from routine cleanings to tooth extractions and dentures, to the women living in transitional housing at YWCA Knoxville. And although those dental services have expanded well beyond the outreach that initially was supported by St. John’s, a spiritual mission still inspires Smiles for Hope’s volunteers.“I’m convinced that this is something that is meant to be,” said Dr. Smita Borole, the dentist who now is the driving force behind the Smiles for Hope nonprofit. Borole is from India, where she was raised in the Hindu faith but also attended a Catholic school, and she feels a higher power guiding her work with Thiel and the YWCA.“The mission is so important, and the difference that we’re making in people’s lives, it is so impactful,” Borole told Episcopal News Service.St. John’s connection to the YWCA began through a group of lay members that call themselves St. John’s Friends. The group began by offering dinners for the women living at the YWCA, and over the years members of the congregation have led Christmas craft projects, donated movie passes and gift cards to the women and worked to provide items from wish lists created by the YWCA.“The Y is just a block from our cathedral, so they are our neighbors,” said Zulette Melnick, who has volunteered with the St. John’s Friends group in the past. “It kind of started on that premise. … It certainly has evolved over the years.”That kind of outreach “really means the world to our residents,” said Emma Parrott, social services coordinator with the YWCA. “We just really appreciate their involvement with us.”The YWCA’s 58-bed facility opened in 1925, and since then it has offered transitional housing for women struggling with a variety of challenges, such as homelessness, the threat of eviction and domestic violence. The demand is great, and the YWCA’s waiting list for rooms is long, Parrott said.St. John’s offers a grant program to help the women pay part of their $140 move-in fees. Residents must have some form of income and can stay up to two years in the single-occupancy rooms, with the average stay being a little more than a year. “The goal is to get them into something more permanent,” Parrott said.YWCA officials gather the women once a month for meetings that provide guidance, support and connections to other services. And at each meeting, the women are offered dental screenings and invited to make appointments with Smiles for Hope.The dental care ministry had been underway for a few years, at Thiel’s instigation, before it became known as Smiles for Hope. Thiel, now 77, previously worked as a dental assistant, and after retiring about 10 years ago she began looking for volunteer opportunities. At the same time, she was wrapping up participation in the Education for Ministry program and scanning the church bulletin when she spotted an opening for a volunteer dental assistant at Knoxville’s Volunteer Ministry Center, which supports people who are homeless.“It was kind of like, OK, well, I guess that’s God saying I need to do something about this,” she said.The Volunteer Ministry Center was developing a new headquarters to include a three-chair dental clinic to serve the chronically homeless, and when that was up and running, Thiel signed on to help. But she also thought of the women staying at the YWCA, who wouldn’t qualify for the Volunteer Ministry Center’s services but still would benefit from free dental care.Thiel said she approached the dentist who was working with the center and asked if he’d be open to treating the YWCA residents on one Saturday a month, when the dental clinic otherwise wouldn’t be in use. He agreed to help, and a new ministry was born.After a few years of that work, the clinic received a fortuitous visit from another dentist who was interested in volunteering. That dentist was Borole, and as she joined the team, she took on more of a leadership role.“She was the spark that we needed,” Thiel said. “She is committed, very, very committed to this ministry.”Under Borole, the ministry incorporated as the Smiles for Hope nonprofit in October 2017 and continues to schedule appointments once a month. Borole attends the YWCA’s meeting with its residents on the first Wednesday of every month and schedules women for appointments over four hours on the following Saturday. The Smiles for Hope clinic typically serves a dozen or more women each month, and Borole and Thiel are supported by several other volunteers, such as hygienists, dental assistants, a lab technician and people who handle paperwork and the intake process.Some patients receive root canals, fillings or crowns. Dental cleanings are common, but Borole’s team also often handles more intensive procedures, such as removing multiple teeth at a time to outfit the women with dentures. Many of the patients have had little to no dental care in the past, either because of the expense or lack of an opportunity to see a dentist, Borole said, so their teeth are decaying or already missing.The goal is to get as much dental work done at once, so the women don’t have to keep coming back for follow-up visits. “They’re leaving that day with a smile,” Borole said.She said she approaches each patient in a gentle manner, because dentistry’s intimacy sometimes can be intimidating. It may be uncomfortable to let a stranger into your personal space, especially for women who have been physically and emotionally abused.The results, however, can be transformative. Borole said she sometimes bumps into former patients in public and is encouraged by their boosted self-esteem and their successes, whether it be securing permanent housing or finding a job interacting with customers without feeling self-conscious about their teeth.“We’ve really gotten to know these women personally, and it really is touching,” she said.Thiel continues to help at the clinics every month, though her role has evolved into something of a general coordinator. Borole sees Thiel as sort of the glue that holds the ministry together, its tireless cheerleader. Thiel said she is happy simply directing traffic when things get hectic on a Saturday morning. Her years of experience with this work are a key asset.“I’m 77 years old. I’ve seen it and done it, been there and back again,” she said. “They can’t present me with much I’ve never encountered.”Thiel and Borole also hope to create a template for other organizations interested in offering free dental care in their own communities, and Smiles for Hope is looking for ways to expand within the Knoxville community as well, such as by working with domestic abuse shelters.“Our goal is to be able to help as many women and children as we possibly can,” Borole said.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Church of England appoints independent Chair for National Safeguarding Panel

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Anglican Communion Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing [Anglican Communion News Service] The first independent chair of the Church of England’s National Safeguarding Panel, former government minister Meg Munn, was installed today. Munn, a former Labour Party Member of Parliament for a constituency in the south Yorkshire city of Sheffield, takes over as chair of the panel from Bishop of Bath and Wells Peter Hancock who continues in his role as the church’s lead bishop for safeguarding.Read the full article here. Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Church of England appoints independent Chair for National Safeguarding Panel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Posted Sep 17, 2018 Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more