Wolfenstein Youngblood will be the first game in the series to release

first_img We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Wolfenstein: Youngblood, the forthcoming entry in the long running nazi-bashing first-person shooter franchise, will be the first in the series to release in Germany unedited, taking advantage of a 2018 law enabling censors to examine games on a case by case basis. Before this point, games in the Wolfenstein have had to scrub their Nazi iconography from the game, in addition to removing the moustache from an aged and infirm Hitler in Wolfenstein II: The New Collusus.Bethesda announced the uncensored release of Wolfenstein: Youngblood on Wednesay on their German language forum initially, but have now confirmed across all channels that the international version of the game, replete with nazi regalia and the ability to batter and blast anyone adorned with it, will be coming to Germany uncensored. It’s good news for FPS fans in Germany who want to play an unsanitised version of one of the best shooting franchises in the business, but it’s also culturally quite significant: the 2018 rule, which allows the USK rating agency to consider their games on a case-by-case basis, allows the inclusion of Swastika’s and other imagery Related: Best FPS Games“Many games produced by creative, dedicated developers address sensitive topics such as the Nazi era in Germany, and they do so in a responsible way that encourages reflection and critical thinking,” the German Games Industry Association said last year, after the new regulations were introduced. “The interactive nature of games makes them uniquely qualified to spark contemplation and debate, and they reach younger generations like no other medium can.” It was unsure at that point what counted as a responsible way, and it’s pleasing to see that Wolfenstein, a game that on the surface has nothing of nuance to say beyond “fascism is the worst, you guys” still gets a pass, showing that it won’t just be thinky games allowed freedom of expression. It’s good news, as other art forms in germany have had these freedoms for a while, so video games are now being given the same treatment as other art forms. Nazis have fallen out of vogue a bit when it comes to video game enemies, but it’s good to know that if they come back to the fore, German gamers won’t have to play censored versions of their shooters. “The interactive nature of games makes them uniquely qualified to spark contemplation and debate, and they reach younger generations like no other medium can.”A sanitised version of the game will also be available in Germany, as Bethesda were working on a version for Germany and an international version in tandem, unclear about how the German ratings board would rule. Wolfenstein: Youngblood comes out worldwide on July 26. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more

Shopify shares fall in premarket even as loss narrows revenue up more

first_img Twitter Email The Canadian Press 0 Comments ← Previous Next → Sponsored By: Shopify shares fall in premarket even as loss narrows, revenue up more than 50% Company reports slowing rate of growth in total sales by vendors using its software in the fourth quarter February 12, 20197:27 AM ESTLast UpdatedFebruary 12, 20198:53 AM EST Filed under News Retail & Marketing Reddit More Commentcenter_img Featured Stories OTTAWA — Shopify Inc. reported a fourth-quarter loss of $1.5 million compared with a loss of $3 million in the same quarter a year earlier.The Ottawa-based e-commerce company, which keeps its books in U.S. dollars, says the loss amounted to a penny per share for the quarter ended Dec. 31 compared with a loss of three cents per share a year earlier.Shopify shares fell about 3.6 per cent in premarket, however, after the company reported slowing rate of growth in total sales by vendors using its software in the fourth quarter.Revenue for the quarter totalled $343.9 million, up from $222.8 million in the last three months of 2017.On an adjusted basis, Shopify reported a profit of 26 cents per share, up from an adjusted profit of 15 per share in the fourth quarter of 2017.Analysts on average had expected a profit of 20 cents per share, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.For the full year, Shopify reported a loss of $64.6 million or 61 cents per share on $1.07 billion in revenue compared with a loss of $40.0 million or 42 cents per share on $673.3 million in revenue in 2017.  advertisement Join the conversation → Share this storyShopify shares fall in premarket even as loss narrows, revenue up more than 50% Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Shopify Inc. office in Waterloo, Ontario.Cole Burston/Bloomberg What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Recommended For YouRussia’s Transneft board to discuss tainted oil, elect chairmanPepsiCo offers $1.7 bln to buy South Africa’s Pioneer FoodsDollar steadies after rise in bets on bigger Fed rate cutFed signals buoy European shares, InBev jumpsFed rate cut hopes power FTSE 100, buyout spurs Acacia Facebooklast_img read more

In August BYD Sold Over 20000 PlugIn Electric Cars In China

BYD plug-in electric car sales in China – August 2018During the first eight months of2018, BYD sold 110,318 plug-ins (more than in all 12 months of 2017) and now the goal for 200,000 turns out to be achievable in the four remaining months.BYD plug-in electric car sales in China – August 2018Currently, BYD offers six plug-in models. Two of those models are available in both BEV and PHEV versions, so a total of eight options.BYD sales breakdown:Yuan BEV – 4,487 (third month on the market and another record)Tang PHEV – 5,043 (second full month of second-generation)Qin PHEV – 4,091 + 825 BEVe5 – 4,003Song PHEV – 1,916 + 83 BEVe6 – 397PHEV and BEVs are selling similarly:BYD plug-in electric car sales in China – August 2018 US Plug-In Electric Car Sales Charted: August 2018 Netherlands Enjoys Three-Digit Growth Of Plug-In Car Sales Plug-In Electric Car Sales Up 245% In Canada In August Source: Electric Vehicle News Another month, another record.In August, BYD for the third consecutive month set a new record for plug-in electric car sales in China, reaching 20,845.The year-over-year growth increased to 90%, while the plug-in share in overall BYD volume stands at 51%.August sales results Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 16, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

UK Excludes PHEVs From PlugIn Electric Car Grant BEVs Still Qualify

Outlander PHEV Captures 41% Of Mitsubishi Sales In UK the changes to the grant announced today will mean:the grant rate for Category 1 vehicles will move from £4,500 to £3,500Category 2 and 3 vehicles will no longer be eligible for the grant Dale Vince Talks Ecotricity’s Electric Highway In Fully Charged new grant rates will come into effect on Friday 9 November – if sales are higher than expected, we may reduce grant rates earlier than this datea new grant rate for category 1 vehicles will be set at £3,500 to reflect the recent reductions in the price of electric vehicles – Category 1 vehicles have CO2 emissions of less than 50g/km and can travel at least 112 kilometres (70 miles) without any CO2 emissions from the tailpipe at all It, of course, means that sales of plug-in hybrids will decrease (after an upcoming spike in demand) as some customers will consider the purchase too expensive without the grant. It shouldn’t be collapse though, since there are still lower car tax rates for the PHEVs.“These vehicles will continue to receive support through lower car tax rates, grants for charging infrastructure and local incentives (such as free parking).”If the funds are exhausted again, further reductions should be expected.Press release:Reformed Plug-In Car Grant extended into next decadeChanges to financial incentives reflect the ongoing success of the Plug-In Car Grant in increasing uptake of electric vehiclesThe government has today (11 October 2018) announced changes to funding to support purchasing the next 35,000 of the cleanest vehicles.For the last 7 years, the Plug-in Car Grant (PICG) has provided a discount to the price of over 160,000 new ultra-low emission vehicles.These changes to financial incentives reflect the ongoing success of the PICG in increasing uptake of electric vehicles, a key part of the government’s Road to Zero strategy.The PICG has helped the plug-in hybrid market become more established, and the government will now focus its support on zero emission models like pure electric and hydrogen fuel cell cars.The changes to the grant announced today will mean that the grant rate for Category 1 vehicles will move from £4,500 to £3,500 and Category 2 and 3 vehicles will no longer be eligible for the grant.The PICG was first introduced in 2011, designed to help stimulate the early market for ultra-low emission vehicles.So far it has supported the purchase of over 160,000 new cars. With plug-in hybrid models like the Mitsubishi Outlander becoming popular among consumers the government is focussing its attention to zero emission models such as the Nissan Leaf and BMW i3.Plug-in hybrid vehicles are among the cleanest on the road, and can deliver significant CO2 savings compared to petrol/diesel cars. These vehicles will continue to receive support through lower car tax rates, grants for charging infrastructure and local incentives (such as free parking).Following the success of the PICG scheme the government has rolled out Plug-In Van, and Motorcycle grants, available to both private and business buyers across the UK.Following the Last Mile call for evidence, and in light of evidence from other countries, a £2 million fund is planned. This will contribute 20% of the purchase price of new e-cargo bikes, up to a threshold of £5,000. Funding will be conditional on individual businesses following a code of cycle safety good practice.This new fund will help to cut congestion and improve air quality, encouraging companies to replace older, polluting vans with a zero emission alternative to create a cleaner, greener future. Money will be split between larger fleets and smaller operators to ensure benefits are available to and spread between all sizes of business.Furthermore, the department has separately set aside £100,000 for capacity building in the industry, and will be reviewing opportunities and potential measures to encourage commercial leasing of e-cargo bikes in order to support widespread uptake over the longer term.We are investing in the design, development and infrastructure needed to speed up the uptake of green vehicles. We are providing £1.5 billion for ultra-low emission vehicles by 2020, and creating a £400 million fund to invest in the roll-out of charging point infrastructure, in partnership with industry.Further informationSince its introduction in 2011 the PICG has:supported the purchase of over 160,000 new cars. 100,000 of which are plug-in hybridsseen over half a billion pounds of investment in the cars of the futureultra-low emission vehicles are already placed into different categories on the basis of their CO2 emissions and their zero emission range:Category 1 – CO₂ emissions of less than 50g/km and a zero emission range of at least 70 milesCategory 2 – CO₂ emissions of less than 50g/km and a zero emission range between 10 and 69 milesCategory 3 – CO₂ emissions of 50 to 75g/km and a zero emission range of at least 20 miles UK reduces the Plug-In Car Grant basically to only to BEVs and FCVs.As the media reported, drying funds caused a major reduction to the Plug-In Car Grant in the UK, which since 2011 enabled the purchase of more than 160,000 significantly cheaper (initially by £5,000 to all plug-ins, and later by £2,500-£4,500 depending on category) vehicles. Most of the grants went to PHEVs (over 100,000).On October 11, 2018, Department for Transport and Office for Low Emission Vehicles announced that from November 9, 2018, only vehicles qualified to Category 1 (BEVs, FCVs, or the longest range plug-in hybrids) will be able to get Plug-In Car Grant and the amount will be £3,500 (down by £1,000).Category 1 – cars with zero emission range of 70 miles or more and CO2 emission below 50 g/km. (£3,500, no price cap)Category 2 – cars with zero emission range 10-69 miles and CO2 emission below 50 g/km (grant not available)Category 3 – cars with zero emission range 20 or more miles and CO2 emission 50-75 g/km (grant not available)See Also Source: Electric Vehicle News Plug-In Electric Car Sales Surprisingly Decreased In UK In September Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 12, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

General Motors Says No To Electric Pickup Truck

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News GM: No electric and no autonomous pickups.We can sense the teary eyes in all of you already.While the electric car market takes off and people are waiting for the next big thing – literally – a pickup from Tesla, Rivian or even Ford, we hear that General Motors is going to sadly stick with gasoline-powered cars and trucks for… decades. That’s not a wise decision, but it seems it’s already been made.EV Pickup Trucks Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 12, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Rivian Electric Truck Spied: On Sale Late 2019 Mike Ableson, General Motors Vice President Global Strategy, said at the GM Global Headquarters in Detroit that we shouldn’t count on an electric pickup from GM:“The core business is going to be the core business for a couple of decades to come. There will not be any AV/EV pickups.”This is kind of depressing, as GM could at least start with a plug-in hybrid version. We believe that many EV enthusiasts will feel that legacy carmaker needs to be forced to do EVs, otherwise, they will not. By forcing, we mean some small competitor like Tesla will have to introduce an electric pickup truck to trigger a change in strategy among the big players like GM.Luckily, that’s precisely what Tesla intends to do.Source: Detroit Free Press Bollinger Motors Announces New B2 Electric Pickup Truck Elon Musk Confirms Tesla Pickup Truck To Follow Model Ylast_img read more

Volvo introduces new allelectric articulated bus for up to 150 passengers

first_imgVolvo has introduced its newest electric bus, an all-electric articulated bus that will come in two lengths and be able to fit up to 150 passengers. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Volvo introduces new all-electric articulated bus for up to 150 passengers appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

On Inauguration Day We Really Ought To Pause And Reflect

first_imgIn recent weeks, the U.S. has brought Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement actions against Brazilian companies based in part on conduct with Brazilian politicians and party parties and another enforcement action against a Chilean company based on its conduct with Chilean politicians and party parties. (See here and here).FCPA enforcement actions frequently include allegations about “golf in the morning and beer drinking in the evening,” expensive bottles of wine, spa and sauna treatments, charitable contributions or internship and hiring practices all involving alleged “foreign officials.”Bribery, the U.S. government says, and confidently proclaims “we in the United States are in a unique position to spread the gospel of anti-corruption” and that FCPA enforcement ensures not only that the United States “is on the right side of history, but also that it has a hand in advancing that history.”Yet on inauguration day, when Washington, D.C. is awash in corporate money more so than a typical day, we really ought to pause and reflect.As highlighted in a recent New York Times article “Corporations Open the Cash Spigot for Trump’s Inauguration”“Chevron, the oil giant, has given $500,000 for the dayslong festivities. Boeing … pledged $1 million. And Sheldon and Miriam Adelson, giants of the gambling industry, are said to have donated more than that by themselves.”Perhaps you heard that yesterday, Adelson’s Las Vegas Sands company resolved an unusual DOJ FCPA enforcement concerning its conduct in China at the 11th hour of Obama Administration.Other corporate donors to inaugural festivities include UPS, JPMorgan (perhaps you heard that a few months ago the company resolved a $202 million FCPA enforcement action based on its hiring and internship practices involving family members of alleged Chinese officials and other private Chinese business executives), Bank of America, Deloitte and AT&T.As stated in the New York Times article:“In exchange, Mr. Trump’s most prolific donors will gain access to what amounts to a parallel inauguration week, carefully planned and largely out of public sight, during which they can mingle with members of the incoming administration over intimate meals and witness Mr. Trump’s ascension from the front rows.”As noted in a related New York Times article “What (Lots of) Money Can Buy At Trump’s Inauguration,” $1 million plus gets one four tickets to a leadership luncheon with cabinet appointees and members of Congressional leadership or four tickets to an “intimate” dinner with Mike Pence and his wife.Don’t have that amount of coin? No worries as $100,000 – $249,999 will still get you two tickets to an “intimate policy discussion” over dinner with cabinet appointees.Least you think this is a partisan post, realize that FCPA Professor highlighted the same pernicious aspects of Obama’s inaugural festivities in January 2013. (See here as well as the article “The Uncomfortable Truths and Double Standards of Bribery Enforcement“).When speaking of FCPA enforcement, the U.S. government has recognized that it “could not be effective abroad if we did not lead by example here at home.”That of course is spot-on.But why are business interactions with “foreign officials” subject to different standards than business interactions with U.S. officials?On this inauguration day when Washington D.C. is awash in corporate money more so than a typical day we really ought to pause and reflect on whether the United States is indeed in a “unique position to spread the gospel of anti-corruption” or on the “right side of history.”last_img read more

Oct 12th Event Notice – The FCPA Turns 40 At Texas AM

first_imgParticularly for Texas readers, here is a link to an October 12th symposium at Texas A&M Law School in Ft. Worth (where I teach an FCPA class in addition to my “home” institution) titled “The FCPA Turns 40: An Assessment of FCPA Enforcement Policies and Procedures.”The free event with CLE credit will include government speakers, professors, practitioners, and a keynote address by Jay Jorgensen (Executive Vice President, Global Chief Ethics and Compliance Officer at Walmart).last_img read more

Updated Jury Awards 53 Million to Irving Man in AM Stadium Wrongful

first_imgNot a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. A Houston jury on Wednesday awarded $53 million to the family of a construction worker from Irving who died in late 2013 while working on renovations for Texas A&M University’s football stadium, Kyle Field . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Lost your password? Usernamecenter_img Remember me Passwordlast_img

Kirkland Latham and Thompson Knight Advise on 375M Investment

first_imgHouston-based Indigo Minerals said Thursday that it completed an equity capital raise worth $375 million that came from a group of new investors and existing investors that have backed Indigo since its 2006 inception . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Password Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Lost your password?center_img Remember me Usernamelast_img

A 27YearOld Takes on the World of Elders – Part 2

first_imgby, Ronni Bennett, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShare1ShareEmail1 Shares[Part 1 was posted yesterday and can be found here.)As I explained yesterday, I “met” 27-year-old Marcie Rogo on the telephone after she emailed me seeking a story on Time Goes By about her fledgling, online business, ConnectAround.I don’t get to spend time with many people her age (these days, with years passing as quickly as they do, those who were once my “young” friends are closer to 40 than 20) and I liked connecting with this smart, hard-working woman who lives in quite a different world from mine.Marcie’s company creates safe, secure online websites for people living in 55-plus communities to help them connect with their neighbors. Here is part of how she explained it to me in her first email:”We started with just me and my first hire Joyce who, at 81 years old, wanted this service in her community. She had just moved in and was finding it very difficult to meet people despite the many amenities and activities offered by her community.“We just provided her a safe place to connect and then spread throughout Rossmoor via a bit of a grass roots effort. Within a few months Joyce was running around with an iPad and she definitely proves age is JUST a number!“Over the past year, groups have been started through the site like Spanish Language practice, Vegan dinners and Poodle Owners. Neighbors have met each other through the site and are now close friends. It’s incredible to watch and makes every thing I’ve been through 150% worth it.”The websites for the first two communities, Summerset in Brentwood, California, and Rossmoor in Walnut Creek, California, were launched in 2012 and more are being added. They are funded by the communities’ management companies and are free to residents.When I asked Marcie for a story about her experience working with and for people old enough to be her grandparents, she responded with some fascinating differences between our generations. Yesterday, she covered, elder paranoia, no free lunches, professionalism and dress habits of the young and old.Here now is Part 2.GRAMMARmarcie Marcie RogoAs you read this, I’m sure you’ve noticed I have horrible grammar. This is not just something that’s genetic in my family but also something that’s common among my generation because of tools like spell check and even grammar check on MS Word.We, as peers, have come to forgive each other. We are writing quick emails back and forth and have prepositions at the end of sentences or do not use a semi-colon where we should or spell something wrong. We are moving so quickly we get the memo, forgive, forget, respond, and move on.This is NOT the case with the older generation. I have gotten numerous messages about my poor spelling or lack of grammar. I am not forgiven. This is a huge problem and at some point we are going to have to hire a copywriter. My bad!SYMBOLS, BUTTONS, ETC.This is quite straightforward. If you weren’t raised using computers, no one should expect that an arrow means “next” or that a gear means “settings.” These are things that I forget, I’m so used to seeing that it’s literally second nature.My generation is full of unintelligent, ageist people that like to conclude that older adults are “computer-tarded” or something of that nature which really makes my blood boil. Put any one of us at a typewriter and expect us to know what to do – we won’t, because we never had to use one.This is why, when everyone asks me why I don’t just target younger communities, I say no. I’m making this for people that don’t have something made for them and who are struggling to use sites that were built for 20-year-old techies.I want to make something for them that is easy to use and doesn’t make them feel stupid. Because they aren’t. I hope there’s a young person that does this for me one day when I am trying to keep up with the whirlwind of changes going on around me.GUESS WHAT’S THE SAME? DATING AND MENDo you know what is exactly the same? Dating. It still stinks! Now, I can only speak from a woman’s perspective but Joyce, our 80-something community liaison, is female and she has told me some stories!!The single men in her community are the obvious minority since many women outlive their husbands or move into the communities as divorcees for safety and security. These men date MANY women at once, even women that are friends. They play the field and do not commit.Sigh, some things will never change. Even my grandmother is having trouble finding a companion. She tells me all the time, “I don’t want to be a nurse, and I don’t want to be a purse. And that’s what these men seem to want.”DO YOU KNOW WHAT NOT THE SAME? CHIVALRYThe men may be playing the field in the older generation but they at least open doors, call on the phone, do not flake, compliment, pay the bill, etc. Also, they do NOT text.The men in my generation think texting is OK for everything. I’ve been texted to be asked out before even meeting. I’ve been texted to find out about my day. I’ve been texted to be told he is cancelling our date. I’ve even been texted to be broken up with.Texting enables men to be cowards, which does allow me to throw them in the bucket faster once I figure this out.Related PostsA 27-Year-Old Takes on the World of Elders – Part1I generally don’t write about commercial enterprises but I was intrigued with the 27-year-old entrepreneur who developed a social network for 55+ communities.”Elder” As InsultThe politics and etiquette surrounding age and aging are complicated and will likely remain complicated.  Susan Swartz throws down the gauntlet at BlogHer.com I was at the BlogHer conference in New York when one of the panelists commented that “even” her own mother blogs. She called her mother “one of those elder…ChangingAging Weekly Blog Roundup Feb. 17-24Elderhood Age War Every human generation has, in its time, yielded (not always happily) to the rising young. The Denialist movement within the Post War generation threatens, in unprecedented fashion, to deliberately break this ancient chain. By clinging to adulthood and demanding both the full complement of adult rights and…TweetShare1ShareEmail1 SharesTags: ConnectAround Elders generations Innovation millennials retirement ronni Bennett TimeGoesBylast_img read more

The New Dementia Story Part 2 Charlie

first_imgby, Marigrace Becker, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShareShareEmail0 Sharescharlie1 Charlie (center, front)We’ve all heard the numbers.With the growing population of older adults in our communities, the incidence of Alzheimer’s Disease and other age-related dementias is on the rise. Every 68 seconds, an American is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease. Over five million Americans live with the disease, and that number is predicted to triple by the year 2050.Cue the ominous music.We’re so used to being terrified when we hear these numbers. But could it be that the most fearful part is not the numbers, but the story we tell with them? The dementia story as we’ve been telling it until recently is a story of despair, shame, loss of ability, loss of meaning and loss of connection. It’s a story of wasting away, a story of devastating disconnect from identity and community. Yes, it’s a terrifying story.However, there’s a new dementia story being told.The last time I heard those statistics about the increase in Alzheimer’s Disease, a man living with early stage memory loss sitting beside me turned to his friend Charlie with the same diagnosis, reached out his hand for a high five, and exclaimed with a grin, “we’re on the rise!” This spirit of optimism, this spirit of embrace, characterizes the new dementia story. It’s a story of strength, courage, hope, purpose, joy, creativity and connection.The new dementia story is being told around the world, it’s being told where I live in Seattle, and it’s being told by people living with dementia.Worldwide, the public narrative around dementia has already begun to shift. Through dementia-friendly campaigns in nations like England and Australia, or cities like Bruges, Belgium or Twin Cities, Minnesota, awareness is building that people living with dementia are a vital part of communities, offer valuable gifts, and can continue to enjoy a full and meaningful life even with their diagnosis.In Seattle, the new dementia story is being told by a variety of organizations and individuals that began working together in May to transform the city into the nation’s most dementia-friendly community. This group, the Alzheimer’s Services Coalition, includes representatives from senior-focused non-profits and businesses, healthcare, the arts, city government, foundations, the media, and community members. Mobilizing their diverse resources, skills and perspectives, they aim to exponentially multiply opportunities for people living with dementia to engage in community.Coalition members celebrate the strengths of people living with dementia by offering a variety of dementia-friendly arts, fitness, volunteer and social programs such as watercolor painting experiences, hikes, improv theatre classes, food bank volunteer programs and Alzheimer’s Cafe events. In the spirit of John Zeisel’s “It Takes A Village” program, the activities happen in public venues, inviting people living with dementia to take full part in community, and utilizing public spaces to tell the new dementia story. As the Frye Art Museum hosts art gallery tours for people living with dementia, as Woodland Park Zoo becomes the site for a weekly memory loss walk, as more and more coffee shops offer monthly Alzheimer’s Cafe events, and these opportunities keep expanding, it’s impossible for Seattle to miss the story: there is life, full life, with dementia.But beyond worldwide movements and local campaigns, the strongest voice of the new dementia story comes directly from people living with dementia. This voice can be heard as people living with dementia remain connected and engaged, and as they take a leadership role in building dementia-friendly communities.Charlie CharlieTake Charlie, for example. Charlie lives with mild cognitive impairment, but his story doesn’t end there. He enjoys participating in various activities that keep him active and connected, including the Memory Loss Zoo Walk and the Alzheimer’s Cafes. He states, “the memory loss zoo walk gets us out into the fresh air so we can have fun and socialize. In addition, it makes us feel that we’re part of a supportive community.” For Charlie, living with memory loss means precisely that – living.Along with staying engaged, Charlie leverages his strengths and perspectives to build a dementia-friendly Seattle. A former computer programmer, he invests time in the Alzheimer’s Services Coalition, co-designing an online calendar system that will help his peers to better access dementia-friendly opportunities throughout the city. Through his role on the Alzheimer’s Association Early Stage Memory Loss Advisory Council, Charlie assists with events like the annual Early Stage Memory Loss Forum. Charlie also advises the development of dementia-friendly enrichment programs as a member of Seattle Parks and Recreation’s Dementia-Friendly Recreation task force. Noting the unique satisfaction he derives from this work, Charlie states, “I’m also an activist in politics and in my neighborhood, but the things I do with and for people with dementia are different, because they give back to me more than I give.” When recognized for his many contributions, he states, “I wouldn’t be doing this if I didn’t know that I’m working alongside people who are absolutely determined to make something happen.” In these various roles, Charlie is working with his community to tell the new dementia story.At Seattle’s Greenwood Senior Center, early stage memory loss program participants are defining the new dementia story with their own words and actions. In October, they chose to work on a project to reduce stigma related to Alzheimer’s Disease. Using drama, they explored their personal experience with stigma and the public’s false perceptions about dementia. Then they named truths about living with dementia that they’d like the world to know: “I’m still here.” “We’re fairly normal, whatever normal is.” “I’m still able.” “I’m not scary.” “I’m a person first.” “Having Alzheimers is an adventure not a disease.” Using these statements and photos of themselves doing activities they enjoy, they are creating and distributing a pamphlet that communicates their vision of the new dementia story and powerfully reclaims their voice, and their place, in community.Having Alzheimer's A statement from Jim, a participant in the Gathering Place.Every day, we can choose to continue telling the old dementia story, a story that condemns and terrifies, a story that adds burden to an already challenging journey. Or, we can choose to stop and listen. There’s a new dementia story being told. It’s a story not of despair, shame, loss and isolation, but a story of joy, strength, growth and connection. It’s a story being told by nations, by cities, and especially by people living with dementia. For the five million Americans living with Alzheimer’s Disease, the new dementia story unleashes a life not consumed by fear, but transformed by hope. Want to change the world? Start by changing the story. As we succeed in telling the new dementia story, we can all say, “We’re on the rise!”Related PostsThe New Dementia Story Part 1: RogerThe new dementia story is brewing, it is ripening, and it is ready to be heard. If we take the time to listen, we may hear a story overflowing with hope, a story not of decline, but a story in which people living with dementia are “on the rise.” This…The New Dementia StoryLast week I watched a news report out of Canada that told a different type of story about Alzheimer’s and dementia. It told the kind of dementia story you almost never see in primetime news — a joyful story.Dementia Rates Are Falling.It’s part of a larger trend that that New York Times has dubbed a “medical mystery of the best kind”: common diseases of aging are in retreat in the United States and some other wealthy countries.TweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: Alzheimers Dementia Innovation Momentia Seattlelast_img read more

Oldest rock crystals point to ancient magnetic shield for Earth

first_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Faint remnants of ancient Earth’s magnetic field have been found imprinted on the oldest rock crystals in the world—evidence that the magnetic dynamo in our planet’s core was alive and kicking more than 4 billion years ago, more than half a billion years earlier than scientists had thought.An early dynamo would have helped life gain a fingerhold: Earth’s magnetic field shields it from the solar wind, a stream of energetic particles from the sun that could strip the planet’s atmosphere of water vapor and other gases necessary for life. “If we know when the magnetic field starts, we have a good sense of how long the Earth has been habitable,” says Rory Cottrell, a paleomagnetist at the University of Rochester (U of R) in New York. Cottrell, U of R paleomagnetist John Tarduno, and other colleagues publish their controversial evidence for an ancient dynamo today in Science.The ancient age has other important implications. Scientists who model the dynamo—which arises as iron in Earth’s liquid core freezes out and cools via convection—will be surprised by the findings because their models generally predict a dynamo beginning within the past 3.5 billion years. The revised age could also bolster evidence for an early start to plate tectonics, which is thought to have begun around the same time as the dynamo. In plate tectonics, moving slabs in the crust and upper mantle cool the mantle via convection, an efficient way of cooling in which hot buoyant material rises, cools off, and sinks again in a circulatory pattern. A cooler mantle would in turn provide a cooler outer boundary for the core, a necessary condition for its own convection to begin and kickstart the dynamo. But the study has already created some controversy, with a rival group saying they can’t reproduce the results of Tarduno’s group. Given the overall importance of the dynamo’s age, the discrepancies are worth sorting out, says Joseph Kirschvink, a magnetist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena and a co-author on the rival study. “When you get two groups looking at the same rocks, from the same place, and getting drastically different results, it’s a little startling,” he says.The Science study began with rocks collected 5 or 6 years ago from the Jack Hills in Western Australia. Mineral crystals in the rocks, called zircons, are hardy things, nearly impervious to time, and many of them have ages of more than 4 billion years—evidence for the oldest rocks on Earth (the zircons originally crystallized in rocks that have long since disappeared). Now, the zircons sit within quartz pebbles within a mish-mashed stone, called a conglomerate, that formed about 3 billion years ago.Tarduno brought a sample a quarter-meter across from the Jack Hills back to his lab and crushed a portion of it. Using optical microscopes, his team painstakingly searched for zircons about 0.2 millimeters across. Typically, magnets are used to sift for zircons, which contain magnetizable minerals such as magnetite—but that would have altered any remanent field in the zircons. The team found several thousand zircons in the sample and selected several hundred that lacked cracks and seemed the most pristine.In a special room shielded from the Earth’s magnetic field by layers of steel and nickel, the researchers put the zircons through a magnetometer—one that works something like an MRI machine except the central tube is less than a centimeter across. The magnetometer, which uses cryogenically cooled superconducting sensors, identified the strength and the orientation of the Earth’s ancient magnetic field when it was “frozen” into magnetite crystals within the zircons. The team sent the best zircons off to another laboratory to get age dates. In the end, the team found quality dates for 44 zircons with an ancient field; the oldest is 4.2 billion years old—750 million years older than the oldest previous estimate of the Earth’s magnetic field based on zircons.But Tarduno’s team also had to demonstrate that the zircons had not been remagnetized at any point in their history. Hot fluids or ambient heat can reset an imprinted magnetic field if the temperature of magnetite rises to 585°C, its Curie point—the temperature at which magnetic fields are set in the mineral. So the team cut a thin section out of their 3-billion-year-old conglomerate sample, and showed that the magnetic orientations of areas containing zircons were all oriented randomly. If the rock had been remagnetized in the past 3 billion years, it is likely that the orientations would have been aligned. Then they had to worry about the zircons’ first billion years or so of existence. The researchers argue that if heat remagnetized the zircons during this earliest period, they would have detected a discrepancy in the uranium-lead radioisotope system used for dating the zircons.But a group led by Ben Weiss, a planetary scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, has serious doubts about the Science study. In a paper in press at Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Weiss and colleagues specifically call into question some of the results. They have analyzed zircons from the same area of the Jack Hills. They have found evidence for alignment of magnetic orientations within the rocks, which they say is due to a volcanic event nearby that would have brought heat to the rocks about 1 billion years ago. “We have not yet found what we can defend as primordial magnetization,” Weiss says.Weiss also worries about using a lack of discrepancies in the uranium-lead system to justify the integrity of the zircons through their first billion years. The uranium-lead system is quite stable—it can take temperatures of 900°C to upset it, whereas the zircons can be remagnetized at 580°, he says. There were plenty of events that could upset the rocks during this time, called the Hadean, he says. It was not a nice time to be on Earth, even for a rock. “We’re talking about the oldest things we know, during the Hadean eon, when the Earth was being pummeled by impactors.”Tarduno is undeterred by Weiss’s skepticism. “Our conclusion is that they haven’t even measured the magnetization that we have,” he says. Much of the debate comes down to the nuances of the different magnetometers being used. Tarduno says the one his group uses is 10 times as sensitive as a typical magnetometer used for this sort of work and is also better at detecting 3D magnetic orientations. Weiss retorts that his group is now using a magnetometer based on quantum diamond sensors that offers better spatial resolution than ever before.At a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in December 2014, a collaborator of Weiss’s used the diamond-sensor magnetometer to show the specific part of an ancient zircon where the magnetization may lie. It turned out it was coming from ferromagnetic materials coating the surface of the zircons, not from magnetites in the interior of the crystal. That’s another sign that these zircons can be contaminated or altered easily, Weiss says. Tarduno says he is glad that Weiss is pushing the limits of these measurements, but does not think that that particular result says anything about the zircons his team selected. “I don’t think it bears on our samples,” he says.Tarduno hopes the groups can come to an agreement and get closer to the true age of dynamo. As a sign of its importance, he looks to Mars, which is also thought to have had an ancient dynamo, but one that was quickly snuffed out. That led to the disappearance of much of the Red Planet’s atmosphere, along with the warmer, wetter conditions that prevailed for a time billions of years ago, he says. “It underscores the importance of early dynamos for the presence of habitable conditions.”last_img read more

The last lonely woolly mammoths faced a genomic meltdown

first_imgThe final days of the last isolated woolly mammoths on Earth were filled with genetic misfortune. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The last, lonely woolly mammoths faced a ‘genomic meltdown’ Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Michael PriceMar. 2, 2017 , 2:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img The Print Collector Heritage Images/Newscom About 3700 years ago, as Mesopotamian poets were composing the “Epic of Gilgamesh,” the last woolly mammoths on Earth were making their last stand on a remote Arctic island. A terminal colony persisted on tiny Wrangel Island north of the Siberian mainland thousands of years after the rest of its kind had disappeared. Now, a new study reveals the mammoths’ horrific final days: A series of harmful genetic mutations appears to have led to what authors call a “genomic meltdown” in the population.Woolly mammoths by the tens of thousands once roamed across ice age grasslands spanning Europe, Asia, and the northern reaches of North America. But after the global climate began warming some 12,000 years ago, mossy tundra began to replace grasses, depriving the massive animals—roughly the size of modern African elephants—of their most important food source. Human hunters further culled their numbers. Woolly mammoths went extinct on the mainland about 10,000 years ago, but small pocket populations persisted on islands, isolated from human contact.Hoping to learn more about the last lonely days of the Wrangel Island mammoths, bioinformatics researcher Rebekah Rogers of the University of North Carolina in Charlotte and biologist Montgomery Slatkin of the University of California (UC), Berkeley, compared the complete DNA sequence from a 4300-year-old mammoth bone found on Wrangel Island with that of a 45,000-year-old specimen that lived on the Siberian mainland. Email The researchers identified a series of major detrimental mutations in the Wrangel Island mammoth. One combination of altered genes likely led to the loss of a large number of olfactory receptors for detecting smells. Another suite of mutations would have reduced the number and variety of the animals’ urinary proteins. Together, those changes would have wreaked havoc on the mammoths’ ability to mark and recognize territory, determine rank, and choose mates, if—like modern mammals—they relied on odors for these tasks. The result for the Wrangel Island mammoth community, which numbered about 300 based on population genetics models, could have been social chaos, researchers report today in PLOS Genetics.In another bizarre twist, two peculiar mutations to a gene known as FOXQ1—well studied in rodents and rabbits—would have given the Wrangel Island mammoths a translucent, cream-colored, satiny coat. The hairs of its fur would have lacked an inner core, possibly robbing them of their insulating properties. Mice with this mutation also suffer from gastric irritation.Harmful mutations like these are predicted to build up in small, isolated populations that become inbred, a phenomenon called genomic meltdown, according to most evolutionary biologists. If your options for a mate are limited, you can’t be too choosy about undesirable genetic traits, so those don’t get weeded out. The Wrangel Island mammoths provide a rare opportunity to see that theory play out in a real population, Rogers says.Though the study included only a single specimen from the island, Rogers is confident its genetics would closely match the island’s other mammoths. That’s because the number and types of differences between its genome and the older mainland mammoth snugly fit mathematical predictions for how much genetic variation should exist between two individuals from the same species over time.Beth Shapiro, a paleogenomics researcher at UC Santa Cruz, who wasn’t involved with the study, agrees. “I think it’s a great example of what evolutionary theories would predict, but it’s rare and great to see in a natural setting,” she says.It is unlikely that any single mutation doomed the Wrangel mammoths—it still isn’t clear exactly what led to their eventual extinction. Rather, their deteriorating genetics would have made it difficult for them to adapt to new social and environmental conditions, Rogers says. Shapiro sees it as a lesson for modern populations that are dwindling and isolated. “By the end, the Wrangel Island mammoths were genetically screwed. Understanding how that happened might help us figure out which species today are most at risk of the same thing happening.”last_img read more

Podcast Teaching selfdriving cars to read improving bike safety with a video

first_imgVisualCommunications/iStockphoto This week, new estimates for the depths of the world’s lakes, a video game that could help kids be safer bike riders, and teaching autonomous cars to read road signs with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Ariana Orvell joins Sarah Crespi to discuss her study of how the word “you” is used when people recount meaningful experiences.Listen to previous podcasts.Download the show transcript.Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com.[Image: VisualCommunications/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img read more

Top stories toxic toads threeparent babies in Singapore and the hunt for

first_img Toxic toads could devastate Madagascar’s biodiversityIn 2014, a toxic invasive species—the Asian common toad—was spotted in Madagascar’s largest seaport. Conservation biologists quickly sounded an urgent alarm, warning that the invader could devastate the African island’s unique biodiversity, which includes lemurs and hundreds of other animals found nowhere else in the world. Now, scientists have confirmed that the toad’s toxic slime will likely kill nearly everything in Madagascar that tries to eat it, according to a study that surveyed the susceptibility of 88 species.Singapore could become the second country to legalize mitochondrial replacement therapy The small city-state of Singapore could become the second country—after the United Kingdom—to explicitly legalize mitochondrial replacement therapy, a controversial assisted reproduction technique that allows women who are carriers of some rare genetic disorders to give birth to healthy babies. A 13-member Bioethics Advisory Committee will make formal recommendations to the government later this year about whether to legalize the technology.Archaeologists start a new hunt for the fabled Lost Colony of the New WorldIn 1587, more than 100 men, women, and children settled on Roanoke Island in what is now North Carolina. War with Spain prevented speedy resupply of the colony—the first English settlement in the New World—and when a rescue mission arrived 3 years later, the colonists had vanished. Archaeologists have searched for traces of the colony, but more than a century of digging has turned up only the remains of a small workshop and an earthen fort that may have been built later. Now, after a long hiatus, archaeologists plan to resume digging this fall.Cost plunges for capturing carbon dioxide from the airPulling carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air and using it to make synthetic fuel seems like the ultimate solution to climate change: Instead of adding ever more CO2 to the air from fossil fuels, we can simply recycle the same CO2 molecules over and over. But such technology is expensive—about $600 per ton of CO2, by one recent estimate. Now, in a new study, scientists say future chemical plants could drop that cost below $100 per ton—which could make synthetic fuels a reality in places such as California that incentivize low-carbon fuels.NASA rover hits organic pay dirt on MarsIn its quest to find molecules that could point to life on Mars, NASA’s Curiosity rover has struck a gusher. Since Curiosity landed in 2012, it has sifted samples of soil and ground-up rock for signs of organic molecules—the complex carbon chains that on Earth form the building blocks of life. Past detections have been so faint that they could be just contamination. Now, samples taken from two different drill sites on an ancient lakebed have yielded complex organic macromolecules that look strikingly similar to the goopy fossilized building blocks of oil and gas on Earth. By Katie LanginJun. 8, 2018 , 3:25 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Top stories: toxic toads, three-parent babies in Singapore, and the hunt for the Lost Colony Email (left to right): BENJAMIN MARSHALL; P. M. MOTTA, G. MACCHIARELLI, S. A. NOTTOLA/SCIENCE SOURCE; SARIN IMAGES/GRANGER Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

In Nigeria a battle against academic plagiarism heats up

first_imgThere’s no conclusive evidence that plagiarism is more common in poorer nations like Nigeria than in wealthier countries. But a 2017 survey of attitudes toward research misconduct in low- and middle-income countries found that respondents perceived plagiarism as “common,” a team led by researchers at Stellenbosch University in South Africa reported last year in The BMJ. Similar views emerged from a 2010 survey of 133 Nigerian scientists conducted by physician Patrick Okonta of Delta State University Teaching Hospital in Otefe, Nigeria. The survey, published in 2014 in BMC Medical Ethics, found that 88% believed plagiarism and other forms of misconduct were common at their institutions.Also fueling concerns about shoddy scholarship in Nigeria is the large number of researchers who publish in low-quality, feebased journals—including a few titles based within the country—that don’t peer review manuscripts or screen for plagiarized material. An analysis of 2000 papers appearing in such journals, published in Nature in 2017, found that researchers based in Nigeria made up the third largest group of authors, behind authors from India and the United States. NYA and NAS are now discussing creating a journal index that would help academics identify “which are good and which are a waste of time,” says NYA President Temitope Olomola, a chemist at Obafemi Awolowo University in Ile-Ife, Nigeria, who is on a 1-year sabbatical at the University of South Africa in Johannesburg.Some high-profile plagiarism cases have involved Nigerians: In 2017, publisher Taylor & Francis retracted 10 publications by Oluwaseun Bamidele, who began publishing papers about terrorism as an undergraduate. Bamidele later told Retraction Watch that he didn’t learn about plagiarism rules until he enrolled in a master’s degree program, and he took responsibility for his missteps. That lack of training is common among Nigerian students, says Olomola, who recalls that he, too, didn’t fully learn citation rules until he was a graduate student in South Africa. NYA’s workshops, he notes, aim to raise awareness of best practices among students and professors, and provide tips for avoiding improper duplication.Many Nigerian researchers believe few plagiarists get caught, Okonta’s survey suggested. But that may change. In 2013, a group of Nigerian vice-chancellors negotiated discounted subscriptions to the antiplagiarism software Turnitin, which screens documents for borrowed material. And Okonta’s university and others have made plagiarism checks a part of faculty promotion reviews.Campaigners also want to institute stiffer consequences for copying. “We need to do a lot more sensitization, telling people about the awful side of being caught,” Unuabonah says. “That will send some fear into their hearts.” Recent dismissals of Nigerian academics for plagiarism are helping that cause, says Charles Ayo, former vice-chancellor of Covenant University in Ota, Nigeria.Nigeria’s two-pronged effort to raise awareness about plagiarism and penalize wrongdoers is a good model for change, says malaria researcher Virander Singh Chauhan, who chairs India’s National Assessment and Accreditation Council in Bengaluru and helped write that country’s new antiplagiarism rules. “This is not an Indian or Nigerian problem,” he says. “It is a global issue, and technology has made it so very easy and tempting.”Ultimately, Nigeria’s antiplagiarism campaigners hope their efforts will not only prevent problems, but also improve perceptions of Nigerian science. “The whole world is watching,” Olomola says. “That still needs to sink into many of our people.” In Nigeria, a battle against academic plagiarism heats up Email Six years ago, Emmanuel Unuabonah, a chemist at Redeemer’s University in Ede, Nigeria, read a scientific paper that made him feel “betrayed.” A colleague from Germany had shown him the study, which was published in a Nigeria-based journal. In it, four Nigerian researchers presented data copied from a paper by the German researcher as their own. Although Unuabonah had nothing to do with the blatant plagiarism, “I felt humiliated,” he recalls. “It was not good for the image of Nigerian science.”The experience led Unuabonah to become a leader in a growing movement to combat academic plagiarism in Nigeria, Africa’s most populous nation and home to more than 150 public and private universities and colleges. Since 2012, the Nigerian Young Academy (NYA)—an off-shoot of the Nigerian Academy of Sciences (NAS) for scientists younger than 45 that Unuabonah helped found—has made educating academics about the pitfalls of plagiarism a major focus of its work. The group will hold a session on preventing plagiarism in August at its annual meeting in Ondo City, Nigeria. This past February, a record 350 participants showed up for a daylong, NYA-run plagiarism workshop, and the group soon hopes to arrange at least six more, one in each of Nigeria’s six geopolitical regions.The fledgling group, which has just 36 members, is also encouraging universities to make greater efforts to detect plagiarism—such as by installing software that can detect plagiarized material—and to penalize those who copy. Last year, NYA itself ejected a member for plagiarism, and it has formally made improper copying a dismissible offense. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country ILLUSTRATION: ISTOCK.COM/DANE_MARK By Linda NordlingJun. 27, 2018 , 2:30 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

Did volcanic eruptions help kill off the dinosaurs

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The hardened lava flows of the Deccan Traps, in western India, may have played a role in the demise of the dinosaurs. By Paul VoosenFeb. 21, 2019 , 2:00 PM What killed off the dinosaurs? The answer has seemed relatively simple since the discovery a few decades ago of a large impact crater in the Gulf of Mexico. It pointed to a massive asteroid strike 66 million years ago that unleashed towering tsunamis and blotted out the sun with ash, causing a plunge in global temperatures.But the asteroid wasn’t the only catastrophe to wallop the planet around this time. Across what is India today, countless volcanic seams opened in the ground, releasing a flood of lava resembling last year’s eruptions in Hawaii—except across an area the size of Texas. Over the course of 1 million years, the greenhouse gases from these eruptions could have raised global temperatures and poisoned the oceans, leaving life in a perilous state before the asteroid impact.The timing of these eruptions, called the Deccan Traps, has remained uncertain, however. And scientists such as Princeton University’s Gerta Keller have acrimoniously debated how much of a role they played in wiping out 60% of all the animal and plant species on Earth, including most of the dinosaurs. Gerta Keller Did volcanic eruptions help kill off the dinosaurs?center_img Email That debate won’t end today. But two studies published in Science have provided the most precise dates for the eruptions so far—and the best evidence yet that the Deccan Traps may have played some role in the dinosaurs’ demise.There’s long been evidence that Earth’s climate was changing before the asteroid hit. Some 400,000 years before the impact, the planet gradually warmed by some 5°C, only to plunge in temperature right before the mass extinction. Some thought the Deccan Traps could be responsible for this warming, suggesting 80% of the lava had erupted before the impact.But the new studies counter that old view. In one, Courtney Sprain, a geochronologist at the University of Liverpool in the United Kingdom, and colleagues took three trips to India’s Western Ghats, home of some of the thickest lava deposits from the Deccan Traps. They sampled various basaltic rocks formed by the cooled lava. The technique they used, called argon-argon dating, dates the basalt’s formation, giving a direct sense of the eruptions’ timing.The researchers’ dates suggest the eruptions began 400,000 years before the impact, and kicked into high gear afterward, releasing 75% of their total volume in the 600,000 years after the asteroid strike. If the Deccan Traps had kicked off global warming, their carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions had to come before the lava flows really got going—which, Sprain adds, is plausible, given how much CO2 scientists see leaking from modern volcanoes, even when they’re not erupting.The dates, and the increase in lava volume after the impact, also line up with a previous suggestion by Sprain’s team, including her former adviser, Paul Renne, a geochronologist at the University of California, Berkeley, that the two events are directly related: The impact might have struck the planet so hard that it sent the Deccan Traps into eruptive high gear.The second study used a different method to date the eruptions. A team including Keller and led by Blair Schoene, a geochronologist at Princeton, looked at zircon crystals trapped between layers of basalt. These zircons can be precisely dated using the decay of uranium to lead, providing time stamps for the layers bracketing the eruptions. The zircons are also rare: It was a full-time job, lasting several years, to sift them out from the rocks at the 140 sites they sampled.The dates recovered from the crystals suggest that the Deccan Traps erupted in four intense pulses rather than continuously, as Sprain suggests. One pulse occurred right before the asteroid strike. That suggests the impact did not trigger the eruptions, he says. Instead, it’s possible this big volcanic pulse before the asteroid impact did play a role in the extinction, Schoene says. “It’s very tempting to say.” But, he adds, there’s never been a clear idea of how exactly these eruptions could directly cause such extinctions.Though the two studies differ, they largely agree on the overall timing of the Deccan eruptions, Schoene says. “If you plot the data sets over each other, there’s almost perfect agreement.”This match represents a victory, says Noah McLean, a geochemist at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, who was not involved in either study. For decades, dates produced with these geochronological techniques couldn’t line up. But improved techniques and calibration, McLean says, “helped us go from million-year uncertainties to tight chronologies.”Solving the mystery of how the dinosaurs died isn’t just an academic problem. Understanding how the eruptions’ injection of CO2 into the atmosphere changed the planet is vital not only for our curiosity about the dinosaurs’ end, but also as an analog for today, Sprain says. “This is the most recent mass extinction we have,” Sprain says. Teasing apart the roles of the impact and the Deccan Traps, she says, can potentially help us understand where we’re heading. 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Fairstein Tried To Control When They See Us

first_img A Disturbing Timeline Of 4-Year-Old Maleah Davis Going Missing After Being Left With Her Stepfather More By NewsOne Staff Derion Vence, Maleah Davis, Brittany Bowens See Also: A Timeline Of Dallas Cop Amber Guyger Killing Botham Jean In His Own Home“She insisted that we look at the transcript of the case, which obviously was part of our research,” Tribeca Enterprises CEO Jane Rosenthal said during a panel on Sunday. “She also had been under a gag order during the [Ken Burns, Sarah Burns and David McMahon] doc and couldn’t speak, but she stated to us that she was getting many offers and that perhaps she wanted to talk to us because she had other offers.”Rosenthal continued, “She was also concerned that we were talking to the five men. So her point of view was clearly that she didn’t want us talking to the five men if we were talking to her.”Fairstein reportedly didn’t respond to TheWrap’s request for a comment on this story.Last week, DuVernay said when she reached out to Fairstein, she actually wanted control over the script.“I informed them that I was making the film, that they would be included, and invited them to sit with me and talk with me so that they could share their point of view and their side of things so that I could have that information as I wrote the script with my co-writers,” DuVernay said. “Linda Fairstein actually tried to negotiate. I don’t know if I’ve told anyone this, but she tried to negotiate conditions for her to speak with me, including approvals over the script and some other things. So you know what my answer was to that, and we didn’t talk.” A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ Fairstein denied that she tried to control the scripts.In great news, TMZ confirmed Dutton, her published, terminated their relationship with the crime novelist. She has written 14 books for the company. Since “When They See Us” aired, there has been an online boycott, which clearly worked. That said, her literary agency, ICM Partners, has not commented.The 72-year-old told The Daily Beast on Wednesday that she had no fear of being dropped by her publisher. “My publisher is fantastic,” she claimed.Fairstein retired from the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office in 2002, the same year that Kevin Richardson, Raymond Santana, Antron McCray, Yusef Salaam and Korey Wise were exonerated because a fellow inmate came forward to confess. Fairstein — along with our current president — still says they are guilty.Watch the powerful trailer for “When They See Us” below, which is available on Netflix.SEE ALSO:‘It’s Above Me Now’: Hotel Clerk’s Video With Racist Guest Goes Viral‘Who Said I Can’t Say Ni**a?’: Blackface Video Of High School Student Sparks OutrageMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s Clothescenter_img Anyone who followed the so-called Central Park Five case knew that Linda Fairstein was one of the key figures who wrongfully locked up Kevin Richardson, Raymond Santana, Antron McCray, Yusef Salaam and Korey Wise. However, with the release of Ava DuVernay‘s “When They See Us” on Netflix, we are getting an even deeper in look into this woman’s psychosis. Producers are claiming she would only talk to them if they didn’t talk to the Exonerated Five men, according to TheWrap. Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family Central Park 5 , Linda Fairstein , Manhattan District Attorney’s Office , When They See Us last_img read more